Headstock Repair - Where To Go

paul-e-mann

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A friend broke the headstock on his favorite SG, who should he take it to for repair? Looking for recommendations...

My friend is in NJ but I'm sure he would ship it to someone worth shipping to.

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fernieite

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One suggestion would be Fred Gabresk in Niagara, Canada. (Freddy's Frets) Pretty close to NJ. He's a luthier and forum member on the Mylespaul Forum. Depending on the break, he might even be able to make it invisible.

I live in Toronto, (where there are lots of good luthiers and techs ) but I'm happy to drive the 1.5 hours to Fred's whenever I need any work done on my guitars. He's that good! He's actually the only one who I let work on my stuff now. My 1963 Les Paul Junior (SG) is actually at his shop right now. :)
 
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paul-e-mann

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Pretty sure somebody posted here an SG they got repaired in Arizona, the repair was literally invisible you couldnt even tell it was ever broken!
 

MR D

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OUCH ! A SILVERBURST Tragedy ! #O!Y $#!T !! too bad !

SWEETWATER put a Neck Binding on a NIGHTHAWK neck for me a few years back, did a great job too...refinished the neck while they were at it too.They were the only people that were willing to do it that I could find.... It took a few months but it wasn't like a local shop that can close up while your waiting and never see your SG again.
 
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paul-e-mann

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OUCH ! A SILVERBURST Tragedy ! #O!Y $#!T !! too bad !

SWEETWATER put a Neck Binding on a NIGHTHAWK neck for me a few years back, did a great job too...refinished the neck while they were at it too.They were the only people that were willing to do it that I could find.... It took a few months but it wasn't like a local shop that can close up while your waiting and never see your SG again.
Good point :yesway:
 

living room rocker

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There's a guy in Pekin IL that has done work for me. Has tons of walk-in business plus lots of guitars shipped to him on a regular basis. Can be found on FB under Josh's Guitar Shop where you'll find a lot of pictures and his commentary on repair work.
 

njpaulc

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Did he buy it locally? If so I would go ask where he bought it if they have a recommendation. You could also go to the nearest Guitar Center and ask them. I would hesitate to ship it.
 

njpaulc

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What's going to happen to it being shipped, that didn't already happen?
Fortunatly it has never happened to me, but the accepted belief is the less disturbed the break, the easier and better the repair. I think shipping it could result in more damage. I would want to go local to see the repairman's work, his shop, and alk to him about what he thinks is the best way to repair the break. There is a repair shop in Scotch Plains that I have never used, I would start there, find out if he is comfortable doing that kind of repair and if he is experienced. I would go to the local Sam Ash, Guitar Center , and to any mom and pop shops looking for recommendations.
 

Col Mustard

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Most good luthiers do several Gibson headstock breaks every month.
It's routine work for a genuine luthier who repairs instruments for professional
musicians. In a highly populated state like New Jersey, there ought to be many
choices. You won't have to drive to Canada or Illinois. Just ask a few professional
guitarists who they take their guitars to for repairs and setups etc.
That SG deserves to be repaired properly by someone who knows how.
A silver burst SG is very desirable... I know. I have one.
Top view@100.jpg

Gibson guitars are susceptible to this damage if improperly handled.
IMHO it isn't a design flaw, it's a function of the traditional mahogany neck and the
Gibson traditional 17 degree back angle.

So IMHO it's the price we pay for the awesome tone we get from our Gibsons.
CONSTANT VIGILANCE... to quote Prof. Moody.
Never let anyone play your SG if they are drunk.
Never lean it against tavern walls, or against your amp.
Always use a high quality guitar stand, and put your SG back in a corner
in between amps and the wall, so no one can trip over it.

Good luck in your quest.
 

MR D

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Greg who?
BTW, SWEETWATER fixed one of Dweezil Zappa's SG's that had a catastrophic headstock injury....they made IT un-noticeable, as if it never happened....there is video of it @ SWEETWATER and you toob....I'd go there.

it doesn't sound like you hav any1 in mind, that's too bad !
 

Huntroll

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That is a really bad break.

I would strongly consider replacing the neck.

Because . . .

I have an SG with a repaired headstock and its a source of constant worry, "is it still holding, is it structially as stong" etc.

When in fact its probably stronger. On mine, theres alot of surface area for the glue to hold, but you never really know.

That break is where the wood is really thick, where you'd expect it never to fail.

The wood itself could be defective.

Rebuilding it with dowels and whatever, forget it, get a new neck, the extra cost will be well worth it.

If you sent it to Gibson, I'd bet that they would agree.

I would see if they had a unique neck laying around like the one on Neil Young's Les Paul.

This is your opportunity to turn the situation around and have a killer instrument in the end.
 

DrBGood

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That is a really bad break.

I would strongly consider replacing the neck.

Because . . .

I have an SG with a repaired headstock and its a source of constant worry, "is it still holding, is it structially as stong" etc.

When in fact its probably stronger. On mine, theres alot of surface area for the glue to hold, but you never really know.

That break is where the wood is really thick, where you'd expect it never to fail.

The wood itself could be defective.

Rebuilding it with dowels and whatever, forget it, get a new neck, the extra cost will be well worth it.

If you sent it to Gibson, I'd bet that they would agree.

I would see if they had a unique neck laying around like the one on Neil Young's Les Paul.

This is your opportunity to turn the situation around and have a killer instrument in the end.
I would have like to have such a (not) bad break on my LP. It's now fixed and playing as before.
22-11-28.jpg

Replacing the neck ? Absolutely no need to go there. The OP's break is an easy one that could hold for a century once properly glued back.
 

Norton

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That's an easy fix. there should be PLENTY of good luthier's in NJ.

absolutely NO need to send this to sweet water. Greg Platzer is one of the best. But he kinda specializes in vintage repairs and reconstructions.

Find someone local. Honestly it's a very straightforward repair.
 

Huntroll

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"The OP's break is an easy one that could hold for a century once properly glued back."

* * * wrong * * *

That neck is SHOT !

Don't put a nickle into a repair attempt.

The truss rod needs solid, strong wood in order to work right.

It may cosmetically look OK but its never going to be structurally adequate as it should be.
 

Norton

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"The OP's break is an easy one that could hold for a century once properly glued back."

* * * wrong * * *

That neck is SHOT !

Don't put a nickle into a repair attempt.

The truss rod needs solid, strong wood in order to work right.

It may cosmetically look OK but its never going to be structurally adequate as it should be.
huntroll... did you look at the OP's pic? you should take a look at drbgood's recent repair thread.

I wouldn't call myself a luthier but I do scratch build guitars and I've fixed worse breaks than the OP's with zero troubles.

Just about any headstock break can be fixed, and the OP's break definitely fits within the perimeters of an "easy fix" kind of break.
 


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