Help with replacement pots/switch

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by alex1fly, Sep 2, 2021.

  1. alex1fly

    alex1fly Member

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  2. skelt101

    skelt101 Well-Known Member

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    Short pots and right angle 3-way toggle.
     
  3. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    :thumb:
     
  4. Bad Penguin

    Bad Penguin Well-Known Member

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    Yep, what he said.
     
  5. alex1fly

    alex1fly Member

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    Thanks, friends.

    Always trying to expand my guitar know-how so I must ask... how do you know?
     
  6. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    If you're not sure, the best thing is to take measurements. Pots and switches will have their dimensions listed. Pull out a pot and the switch and measure the depth of the holes. Then measure the depth of the control cavity. Then use the parts that will fit best.
     
  7. papagayo

    papagayo Well-Known Member

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  8. Bad Penguin

    Bad Penguin Well-Known Member

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    How do we know.....? 1) A les Paul has the 3/4" maple cap, it requires long shaft pot. The SG, has a much thinner top, requires the short shaft. 2) A Les Paul has a thicker body, so it uses the straight 3 way switch. The SG being thinner, uses the "L" shaped one. 3) We all at one point, bought the wrong parts, so it's based on experience.
     
  9. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Depends which Les Paul we are referring to.
    My Les Paul Junior DC doesn't have a maple cap or switch and uses short shafts.

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Bad Penguin

    Bad Penguin Well-Known Member

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    I stand corrected.
     
  11. Decadent Dan

    Decadent Dan Active Member

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    Your 2013 switch is probably mounted to the pcb. You could possibly desolder it, bend the tabs up if necessary and reuse it. Gibson changed it later to a wired plug.
    I’m thinking you can probably cut the plug off the existing switch and reuse it and the wire too.
    So you’re basically looking at 4 short shaft pots and 2 caps.
    The only other thing I can think of is the splines on the shaft. There are coarse and fine splines. Fine is US CTS Gibson type and Coarse is import type.
    Fine spline knobs have 24 and the pot has 20 (10 on each side of the split).
    That way you can reuse your knobs too.
    If you want to change knobs, keep that in mind.
    You might also want to buy from someone who has checked the values of the pots. If it’s in the low 400k range, it might still be considered within 20% tolerance of 500k but not what you want.
    It could be 450k and still be within 10%.
    That’s why you see some made over 500k, like 550k they can be 10% under and still be close to 500k.
    Just because it is stamped 500k doesn’t mean it is. It might be mid to high 400’s or low 500’s. Buy a cheap multimeter and check the new ones anyway. Sometimes it’s better to pay a little more for a tested part than have to return one that’s lower than the rest.
    Do most of your soldering outside the control cavity.
    Oh, and use a socket or nut driver to tighten the nuts. Don’t put pliers on it because they sometimes slip. Protect the outer edges of the control cavity before you go in with a soldering iron. Clean the area to be soldered prior to and it will be much easier. Dirty pots don’t solder well. Scratch it with some very fine sandpaper to get a clean area for your ground.
    You might want to heat sink your caps too but I’m no expert on this stuff.
    I usually get someone else to do it for me but I’ve watched and learned from a few people.
     
  12. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    I've never bought the wrong parts, because if I was unsure I simply measured, like I mentioned above. :thumb:
     
  13. alex1fly

    alex1fly Member

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    Took some measurements and ordered parts. Good thing I took measurements, because the cavity is just under 1" deep which makes it too shallow for push/pull pots.
     
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  14. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Well-Known Member

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    Nothing like taking proper measurements and making sure you get the right parts from the "get go". This should always be the first step in any repair or potential modification. If more people did this, there would be far fewer people posting their frustration with things that were very preventable.
     
  15. alex1fly

    alex1fly Member

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    Definitely. And there's quite the variety in sizes for something as simple as pots - shaft width, mounting depth, etc. I know these pots will fit in my cavity... we'll see if the existing knobs will fit on the new pots, lol.

    Disappointing that it won't fit push/pull pots - I was hoping to do independent coil split or parallel wiring. I can still do it with two switches, but it's extra stuff in the cavity and would be a permanent modification.
     
  16. Torren61

    Torren61 Member

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    For ease of installation and good tone, I would suggest a Mojo Tone solderless SG wiring harness. They're inexpensive and very easy to install. They use quality parts and you can remove it easily as a unit if you decide to do that. It also makes it easy to quickly swap out pickups with very little effort. $130 and you don't have to solder a thing. Sweetwater sells them. They're made specifically for SG guitars so everything fits perfectly.
     
  17. plankton

    plankton Well-Known Member

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    $130 is inexpensive? There's like $40 worth of parts in a wiring harness, and that's using quality stuff.
     

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