How delicate is the neck joint?

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Rusty Chops, Aug 5, 2020.

  1. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    No they don't. You'll need much more abuse than that to put a Tele out of tune.
     
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  2. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Tele's make fantastic survival tools. You can improvise a sled by sitting on the body and grabbing the headstock and pulling back, letting you easily glide down snow covered hills. If you have two, you can remove the necks and fashion a pair of skis. If you are being hunted the body can be strapped your chest to provide protection from arrows and bullets. You can also use it to pound in tent stakes or whatever else needs bashing. Then in the evening you can reassemble it, tune it up and play some songs to pass the time.

    Then, once you escape the wilderness you can sell it on Reverb for twice the market value because it's now a relic.
     
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  3. Rusty Chops

    Rusty Chops Well-Known Member

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    Put this one together about 15 years ago. It’s been gigged plenty, and never even SEEN a hard case. My #1 for a dozen years at least. Battered, bruised, dropped, and had sandwiches made using the back!

    BF7DA8D5-F4CC-4D6E-8E82-DF5C406F10AF.jpeg 99BF1738-00F8-4FA5-AB5B-C9FBC178189C.jpeg
     
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  4. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    And here's mine

    tele front.png

    tele back.png

    Not quite standard. It has a Strat style belly carve, a tone cap selector switch and a zero fret.
     
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  5. Rusty Chops

    Rusty Chops Well-Known Member

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  6. ezypikins

    ezypikins Member

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    Back in the early 70's. Our guitar/trumpet player/singer, (he was a busy guy) set his Musicmaster case down behind the car at load out. Got in car with the bass player. Car backed right over the guitar. Didn't break the case, didn't break the guitar. To my knowledge, that guitar is still playable today. Sounds like Fender crap, but still playable.
     
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  7. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    Here's my little rant about this from the SG wiki:

    "Headstock breaks are more common, but that still doesn't necessarily mean the design is flawed. Simply put, fine instruments are often delicate and are to be treated with care. You wouldn't call a Stradivarius violin "flimsy". Generally speaking, SGs were not treated with care until they started gaining vintage status in the 1990s, much later than Les Pauls. Also, people seem to assume the early '60s design is weak because of how it looks from the outside, without knowing the design of the mortise and tenon inside. The design featured a substantial tenon equal to the entire width of the neck, which reached nearly to the back of the neck pickup cavity as well. By contrast, modern Custom/Historic SGs use a functionally identical design and have not gained this reputation for neck breaks. Also, it's not like there aren't late '60s SGs or even Les Pauls with broken necks out there."

    TLDR: If you've broken a neck, it was YOUR fault, not the guitar's.

    The beauty of the SG is that you can get a vibrato by simply grabbing the body somewhere (like the top horn) and wiggling it (with no hand on the neck). That's perfectly safe because the only pressure on the neck is it's own weight.

    Yeah, it seems like back in the days before anything was "vintage", people just treated guitars like disposable tools for a job. IMO, that is the real reason you see a fair amount of vintage SGs with broken necks.
     
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  8. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    I really dig the flame on that neck. A tele is the next thing on my "gee, why didn't I ever have one of these? I'm getting one" list.
     
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  9. Rusty Chops

    Rusty Chops Well-Known Member

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    Warmouth neck. The first neck was a used Fernandes I got for cheap.
    It needed frets eventually, but I figured instead I’d order a neck. I like ‘em big.
    I like Gibson necks better, but I’m used to that Warmouth.

    E87BD120-31FD-4A82-B14D-081E6442CAC0.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2020
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  10. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    Interesting that you like a bigger neck but settled on a small guard SG, which typically have the slim neck profile. How's it feel for you?
     
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  11. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Modern SG with small guards typically have slim neck profiles, probably because of all those SG '61 Reissues that were produced and now the SG Standard '61.

    In the past I had the following...

    1963 SG Special (small guard)
    1969 SG Special (batwing)
    1970 SG Standard (batwing)
    1970 SG Junior (batwing)

    None of them had slim taper necks.
    They all had rounded neck profiles.
    Each year the necks got chunkier.
    By 1970, they were baseball bats.

    1970 SG Junior...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2020
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  12. Rusty Chops

    Rusty Chops Well-Known Member

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    The CS ‘64 SG Standard has a medium C, which I find comfortable enough. Any less starts to alert me.
    I’ve passed on a lot of pinner neck SG’s, and owned a few batwing models that I liked, even the roasted maple one was sufficient.
    I tend towards larger, because small ones hurt my beat up ancient hands. However, not every neck hurts, just a certain combination. Longer scale makes me want heft. Gibson’s scale is better for me, but there’s a definite limit to how slim I go on them.
    When I was younger I liked slim and supple, but as the years passed I got old somehow.
    It’s sneaky.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2020
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  13. Rusty Chops

    Rusty Chops Well-Known Member

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    NOW you’re talkin’!
    My partsotele is like that.
     
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