I Moved My Strap Button!

3bolt79

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Can you show a picture of the tool you used. Might want to get one for my Dremel.
 

Knucklehead71

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It is a shame that Epiphone sells unbalanced guitars, the wood is low density. And they find customers, $800 a piece of wood is a scam.

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It's a shame that Gibson sells unbalanced guitars. How much is a new SG Standard these days? I've owned several that were so neck heavy it was a joke.

$2000 a piece of wood is a scam.
 

Alanbama

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This Epiphone SG Modern was around $500.00 and is a great guitar. I also have an Epiphone 1961 reissue Les Paul SG that cost me a little over $800.00 and it came with Gibson Burstbuckers, CTS electronics, and switch-craft jack and toggle switch. It is an absolutely awesome instrument. I, like you’ have owned several Gibson SG’s and neck dive is always a problem but this Modern that I have has a 3/4”maple cap on it then a laminated flame maple overlay and especially since I moved the button, neck dive really isn’t a problem! I also use a 3” cotton strap that won’t slide on my shoulder, and that works well too. It’s a Levy strap. Thanks for your input! 😎
 

DrBGood

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It's a shame that Gibson sells unbalanced guitars. How much is a new SG Standard these days? I've owned several that were so neck heavy it was a joke.

$2000 a piece of wood is a scam.
You know that papagayo is the ultimate Epiphone troll. He will vomit on anything and everything that has the Epiphone name on it. Just put him on the ignore list.
 

Alanbama

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You know that papagayo is the ultimate Epiphone troll. He will vomit on anything and everything that has the Epiphone name on it. Just put him on the ignore list.

You are absolutely right! I have him in my ignore list. He’s got to be the dumbest guitarist I’ve ever been exposed to!
 

papagayo

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It's a shame that Gibson sells unbalanced guitars. How much is a new SG Standard these days? I've owned several that were so neck heavy it was a joke.

$2000 a piece of wood is a scam.

A Gibson SG Special or a Gibson SG Tribute buries any Epiphone.

Neck dive concern Epi my friend.
 

Knucklehead71

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You are absolutely right! I have him in my ignore list. He’s got to be the dumbest guitarist I’ve ever been exposed to!

I'm definitely in agreement with you there.

Just to be clear to everyone else here. I currently own 3 Gibson SGs, and 1 Epiphone SG. I also own a Gibson Les Paul Standard Plus, and have owned a number of other Gibson SGs and Les Pauls in the past.

My two main guitars are my Gibson SG-1 and Gibson SG-X. These two guitars are incredible and I wouldn't part with them for anything. My other Gibson SG is a 2014 SGJ. It's okay. It doesn't balance as well as my other two, but it fortunately doesn't neck dive. Every single SG Standard I have owned in the past has varied between slightly unbalanced, to horribly neck diving. This is mainly due to a Gibson design flaw. it has nothing to do with poor quality wood. The SG body is just too thin, and therefore too light. The body really needs to be 1/8" to 3/16" thicker. In my opinion, that would fix or at least reduce the problem.

My Epiphone SG is a SG Classic Worn P90. It's a great guitar and balances perfectly. The only negative was a few uneven frets (I am very picky about fretwork) and I did a full fret level, crown and polish on the guitar when I got it. Problem solved.

There is a serious issue with current Gibson quality control, and value for money, or to be specific, lack of both. I've seen way too many new Gibsons with file marks on the fretboard and binding, and rough, dry fretboards. My own Les Paul had an inlay fall out and I had to glue it back in. I have not seen these same issues with the Epiphones I've looked at. I was looking at an Epiphone SG Prophecy recently at Long & McQuade. The damn thing was flawless. There is absolutely no excuse for Gibson to let guitars leave the factory like this, especially considering the price. The problem is, people still buy them. Gibson have learned to be complacent with shitty quality control because why would they care? Stupid people buy them and accept them for what they are, because these people are more concerned about the logo on the headstock than about the actual quality of what they're getting. Then you get online trolls like this GayPapa dude who have no actual knowledge, but for some reason waste their time spewing bullshit to make themselves feel better.

I'll still buy more Gibsons when I find nice older ones for good prices, but they're getting harder to find.
 

Alanbama

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I agree with you also! To be honest Gibson used to be ALL that I would use, unless I needed a different guitar for a particular song or something, and it is kind of sad for me to look at my now small collection and only see the one Gibson SG Standard! I’ve been retired for a little while now and don’t have the income that I once had so I have to always take that into consideration, especially in today’s economy but I still manage to grab a good deal here and there.
 

Go Nigel Go

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... This is mainly due to a Gibson design flaw...
This is the only part of the whole post I would question or take issue with. The SG is typically a light to very light guitar with a small body. There aren't many that even come close to the size, shape, and low overall weight of the SG, and those few that do will experience many of the same balance concerns unless the body shape is very different and allows a different strap button placement.

The SG is what it was designed to be, and if it was something else it wouldn't be an SG. You wouldn't buy a motorcycle and complain about there not being enough trunk space for groceries... well... some people would maybe, but it still wouldn't be a design flaw. :D
 

Alanbama

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This is the only part of the whole post I would question or take issue with. The SG is typically a light to very light guitar with a small body. There aren't many that even come close to the size, shape, and low overall weight of the SG, and those few that do will experience many of the same balance concerns unless the body shape is very different and allows a different strap button placement.

The SG is what it was designed to be, and if it was something else it wouldn't be an SG. You wouldn't buy a motorcycle and complain about there not being enough trunk space for groceries... well... some people would maybe, but it still wouldn't be a design flaw. :D
😂 you’re absolutely right! Anyway there is nothing else on my SG’s that I would change. I actually just moved it because that’s where I wanted it. I’ve never been in the middle of a song or anything and thought, you know. This guitars neck just won’t stay up. SG’s are one of my favorite designs! The strap button move is really just a personal thing. Just like adding extra trunk space to that motorcycle!😎
 

Go Nigel Go

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Yup, and just because I wouldn't move the strap button on mine doesn't make anyone else wrong. I like a motorcycle that is stripped down to bare essentials, but some people like full fairings and 10 cubic feet of panniers. Doesn't make one preference or the other wrong, it just gives us all the option to get or make whatever we want. You choose the design that has the most features you like, and modify the rest if needed.
:cheers:
 

Knucklehead71

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This is the only part of the whole post I would question or take issue with. The SG is typically a light to very light guitar with a small body. There aren't many that even come close to the size, shape, and low overall weight of the SG, and those few that do will experience many of the same balance concerns unless the body shape is very different and allows a different strap button placement.

The SG is what it was designed to be, and if it was something else it wouldn't be an SG. You wouldn't buy a motorcycle and complain about there not being enough trunk space for groceries... well... some people would maybe, but it still wouldn't be a design flaw. :D
True enough, but there is no denying the propensity for neck diving in SGs, and that little bit of extra thickness would help prevent it, and would still be a lighter guitar than something like a Les Paul. And don't get me wrong here, as I said, my SGs are my favorite guitars.

I'm actually building myself another SG (well 2 actually). One has a flame maple top like an SG Supreme, and the other one will be like a standard, but no pickguard. That one will have a slightly thicker body than usual. I don't want to risk spending the time building a guitar and finding out that it's neck heavy when it's finished.
 

Go Nigel Go

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Yes, and like I said the only thing I would debate is that it (neck dive) is a design flaw. My SG weighs in a shade under 5 pounds, and neck dives like a Mo'Fo with a slick nylon strap. A suede strap solves the problem. My SG weighs about half of what my Les Paul does, and still looks, feels, and plays great.

My only point was that Gibson designed the guitar they built on purpose, and neck dive was considered an acceptable tradeoff, if it was even considered at all. If Neck dive is a major concern for a player I can understand that, and the SG is probably not going to be a guitar they will be happy with. When I got mine there were several things that bugged me for a week or so, but once I got it sorted with a grippy strap and adapted to the instrument I wouldn't change a thing.

I bought the SG thinking it was the same as a Les Paul just a little different looking. Nope. It is a LOT different. Like it or hate it, the balance issue is part of the package. You can add weight, but that negates a major advantage for the stage player doing several shows a week looking for a bit of shoulder relief.

Also, Congrats on making your own instruments! By all means make them what you want, and I wish you all the best success in the world. I also promise not to call it a design flaw if they come in a few pounds heavier than mine! :D
 


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