In need of more brain food pls

DrBGood

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Looks like the mucked up job a tech did on my PRS. I guess there wasn't enough material to recrown.

Tom's Guitar Shop fret job 3.jpg
 

Igonuts

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Was thinking more like, era in which the wider frets were used on SG's. What members feel bout them when played. Pros, cons. Memory serves, they felt like every time you played a note, the string felt bottomed out. Eh, the oposite of scallopping so to speak. IDK how to splain it. Very firm, dare i say hard. But in a good way. Solid. Hard to remember. Went from a telly sold to buy the SG. Only my third guitar at the time. Ramble.........
 

MR D

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My first gibson was a used SG std. I believe it was around '72 or 3. Had very wide frets. Like the ones shown in this thread, https://www.everythingsg.com/threads/1976-sg-standard.38164/ . Mine, i think had the tune o matic bridge.
I was wondering bout the history of those super wide frets.
i cant seem to find any specific info.

So pls educate me. Pls! Ty oh guitar gurus of ETSG.

the SG I had w/'em buzzed, despite the 1 or 2 adjustments I could make at the time, was beyond my talents @ the time, buzzzzzz...then a luthier told me to get different frets......so i just sold it...
 

Decadent Dan

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It’s a 70’s/early 80 Norlin era thing.
LP’s have them too.
Railroad tracks, School bus, Fretless blunder…
 

Go Nigel Go

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My '71 SG and my '78 "the Paul" both have these low wide frets, and I have to say, I really like them. Maybe it's because "the Paul" was my first electric back in 1986, which means I have been playing them for like 37 years, but they make for a very smooth and light action that suits me right down to the ground.

Necks and frets are some of the most subjective and hotly debated characteristics on a guitar, but at the end of the day it all comes down to what you like and find comfortable. All I can say is that if you like low wide frets, you will love a '70s era Gibson with the "Ghost Frets".
 

Igonuts

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I appreciate the enlightenment oh ETSG gods. The SG was the guit that sold me on gibbies. Early in my playing. I love the blues. Fenders envoked blues for me. I mean thats what they make me play. But gibbies envoked a wider range of genres (R&R/R&B). Always liked the sound of the pick squeek/crunch when striking the strings.
Ty again folks.
 

Go Nigel Go

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I don't think it an official designation, just a common slang for short wide frets found on some Gibsons. They are so low that while they are visible, but feel almost like they aren't there... Ghost frets if you will. :D
 

PermissionToLand

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The frets didn't come from the factory that way. They're just worn down from 40 years of playing. SG and LP Customs used the low, flat "Fretless Wonder" frets, but only Customs and nothing else, and that ended in the mid '70s IIRC.

I believe Gibson has always used medium jumbo frets as standard equipment. If not, they'd presumably be putting lower frets on the Historic Reissues for accuracy.
 

Igonuts

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The frets didn't come from the factory that way. They're just worn down from 40 years of playing. SG and LP Customs used the low, flat "Fretless Wonder" frets, but only Customs and nothing else, and that ended in the mid '70s IIRC.

I believe Gibson has always used medium jumbo frets as standard equipment. If not, they'd presumably be putting lower frets on the Historic Reissues for accuracy.

Fretless Wonder. K, so thats real.
https://www.sweetwater.com/insync/fretless-wonder/
Now you guys are the gurus, but me thinks the SG std had them too. But,,, i concede to more knowedgable ppl. My memory could be off. But the SG i played in 72 was a used one. IDK the year. Was only 275 USD. Humbuckers w abr. And i swear those flat frets. Having an abr makes it not too old. Right? Admittedly a lot of drugs back then so..... My 20th aniv LP had the normal jumbos. Thats a '74.
Honestly, couldnt say if it was a std or custom. Just a guit to me at that time. Cant see a custom going for 275. Even used. Oh heckle. I dunno. Suppose. The 20th LP only ran me 750 USD in march '75. Out of a pawn shop tho.
---------
Actually did get somewhere on ghost frets. Aside from that canadian guy, i found the term relative to fretless basses. Flush 3/4 length frets. Makes sense. My brother had a custom MIM fretless neck he fitted to a "Flea" bass. It has those short flush frets. Actually they're 1/2 length on 5, 7, and so on w 3/4 marking the 12th.
 
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everdying

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ya the 70s gibson standards had flattish frets too... they just weren’t as low as the fretless wonders.
 

PermissionToLand

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I did some digging and found somebody who owns a 1960 Les Paul who measured his original frets at .100" wide: https://www.lespaulforum.com/index.php?threads/fret-wire-size-like-59-60-gibson-wire.118538/

Also, this site is a great resource on Gibsons and says post-1959 the width was .100"

http://www.guitarhq.com/gibson.html#specs

  • Gibson used a smaller .070" wide frets until about 1959. Then the width changed to .100". This happened to pretty much all models at some point in 1959. There were some exceptions though, like the Les Paul Custom (which kept the smaller .070" wide frets, as it was labeled the "fretless wonder").

And most others say the height was around .036", which puts them right in line with modern medium-jumbo frets.

https://www.lespaulforum.com/index.php?threads/fret-size-on-60s-gibsons.177411/

https://zinginstruments.com/guitar-fret-wire-sizes/

https://www.guitarpartsfactory.us/FRET-6130-Dunlop-Accu-Fret-6130-Fretwire
 

Igonuts

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Ty PTL. Thats a mouthful of info. Fell asleep last night reading all that. Great sources. Tnx

I don't think it an official designation, just a common slang for short wide frets found on some Gibsons. They are so low that while they are visible, but feel almost like they aren't there... Ghost frets if you will. :D

BTW, i found Ghost frets also have to do w,

"Ghost Fretting: The phenomenon that occurs when one note is played on a fretted instrument, such as a guitar, but the resultant sound is that of a different note. The effect has yet to be explained in scientific circles."

https://www.talkbass.com/threads/fret-ghosting-or-ghost-fretting.1416943/page-2
 

Decadent Dan

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I had a 80-ish “The SG” that I thought had them. I had it re-fretted and sold or traded it anyway.
I also had a 80-ish black LP Custom that had them too.
It didn’t stay long either.
I loved that guitar but the frets ruined it for me.
Norlin Years ended in 85 but it was probably a good thing.
Things like the Sonex, L6S and Marauder happened too.
 
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PermissionToLand

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Fretless Wonders should be pretty unmistakable because they aren't crowned at all, they're totally flat like a staple.

Here's a picture of some new old stock Fretless Wonder fretwire (so we can rule out any play wear), and you can see they're basically a T shape.

http://www.timeelect.com/fw-3.jpg

http://www.timeelect.com/fw-2.jpg

It's only due to years of play wear that anything other than a Custom would look close to that.
 


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