Intellectuals

Should intellectuals be a protected class like handicapped people or ethnic minoritie?

  • Yes

    Votes: 2 18.2%
  • No

    Votes: 9 81.8%

  • Total voters
    11

Go Nigel Go

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I am loath to create any sort of legally protected "class" of person. It tends to breed resentment in "unprotected" individuals, and often rewards people who then assume they possess some inherent quality that precludes the need for further growth or effort on their part.

I do think that anyone who takes an intellectual approach to any task or discipline is worthy of respect, and more people should be encouraged to use logic, reason, art and skill in their daily lives. In fact I can't think of a single job or task that would not benefit from a more thoughtful and reasoned approach. I think rather than segregating "thinkers" and 'laborers", society would most benefit from encouraging critical thinking across the board, rather than making complex thought the sole province of an elite or protected class of individual.
 

Biddlin

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m loath to create any sort of legally protected "class" of person.
So the lame, blind, infirm, etc. should fend for themselves in a Darwinian society?
It tends to breed resentment in "unprotected" individuals,
That explains the Corvette parked in two handicapped spots at the drugstore, I guess.
and often rewards people who then assume they possess some inherent quality that precludes the need for further growth or effort on their part.
So I should feel so rewarded for my infirmities? This callous indifference to others is of course what necessitated laws enumerating specific rights for all.
 

donepearce

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I am loath to create any sort of legally protected "class" of person. It tends to breed resentment in "unprotected" individuals, and often rewards people who then assume they possess some inherent quality that precludes the need for further growth or effort on their part.

I do think that anyone who takes an intellectual approach to any task or discipline is worthy of respect, and more people should be encouraged to use logic, reason, art and skill in their daily lives. In fact I can't think of a single job or task that would not benefit from a more thoughtful and reasoned approach. I think rather than segregating "thinkers" and 'laborers", society would most benefit from encouraging critical thinking across the board, rather than making complex thought the sole province of an elite or protected class of individual.

Critical thinking is actively discouraged in many societies, faith being promoted as the desired method of "reaching the truth". I'm not holding my breath while I wait for that to change. Of course critical thinking is the best way to proceed, but that takes an effort many people are unwilling to apply. Much easier to simply accept what someone in a uniform tells you.
 

SatansGwitar

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no one still has answered my question of how any minority is considered a protected class as the OP headlined it or have I been misinformed all my years on this planet?
 

Go Nigel Go

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I would say that laws which promote equal rights are different than laws which create a protected class. An intellectual approach to issues such as physical handicap would certainly allow for accepted standards for building accessibility and other such accommodations.

Things like a Corvette double parked in a handicapped spot are more an issue with someone who feels they are in a privileged class, or a misguided ignorance about what equality of access actually is. If I could magically create a just and equitable legal "butthole clause" I would do so, but I can't. As a aside, I have seen and worked on a handicap adapted Corvette before, just sayin'. Not trying to sharpshoot anyone, but I also think it is unfair to assume that my unwillingness to create legally privileged classes for something which in my opinion can't be adequately defined for the purposes of just redress under the law in no way equates to lack of empathy or a desire for a world where only the strong survive.

I would also support laws which prevent legalized segregation and discrimination based on race, ethnicity, or other class based distinctions. If you are going to have government, it is more important in my view to limit it's ability to do harm than it is to try and use it as a panacea for any and all social ills. Creating protected or privileged classes may seem harmless until it isn't, and by then it will be too late for simple solutions.
 

Biddlin

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no one still has answered my question of how any minority is considered a protected class as the OP headlined it or have I been misinformed all my years on this planet?
how-to-handle-a-child-who-has-been-sexually-abused.jpg
Financial-Assistance-for-Disabled-Adults-and-Families-6-Great-Resources-iStock-605759166-1-765x555.jpg
new-slide-5.jpg
custody-officers-at-cops-and-kids-event.jpg

images

Here are a few examples of legally protected classes of people.
 

cerebral gasket

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According to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the term "handicapped" has been replaced with "disabled".

It's "person with a disability".
Not "handicapped people".
 

Go Nigel Go

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If someone needs my help, and it is within my ability to give it, they have it. In my lifetime I have seen many "polite terms" become corrupted in common usage by the preponderance of unthinking or unfeeling individuals. The issue is the intent of the speaker, not the precise words used in conversation that are harmful. Any polite term for a learning disability becomes the next insult to be co-opted by bullies who intend to shame or socially harm others. As such, the acceptable terminology becomes a rapidly moving target which is precisely NOT the sort of problem that can be easily solved by legislation. Using terms of denigration is a real world problem, but it is the attitudes of people with ill intent that need to be addressed. Any term which applies only to a specific group of people is on it's face a form of segregation, and as such needs to be used with care. It is also open to rampant abuse if you are inclined that way to begin with.

My personal way of dealing with a person who has a disability is simply to recognize that "Charley is going to need a hand with this task" or "Suzy needs better access to get her chair to my business". When discussing thorny topics on the internet, I choose my words in the moment as carefully as I can, and try to live with the responses as best I can.
 

donepearce

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The big problem with words, and the current tendency to legislate permitted use, is that they change their degree of acceptability day by day, so it is impossible to keep up with them. Unless the lawmakers are going to issue a weekly amendment bulletin, they should just admit that the project is doomed to failure and abandon it. This is all about the contract between listener and speaker. If the speaker means no ill, it is unlikely that a listener would hear insult unless they were really trying for it. On the other hand it is usually pretty simple to spot when something is said maliciously. Usually it is something completely accurate but so banal that there would seem no reason to even mention it.
 

cerebral gasket

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I do not think it was ill-intended by the use of the term "handicapped people" in the thread title.

It reminded me of the experience I had years ago when I used to work in the sign industry. We were instructed that accessible parking spaces were no longer to be called "Handicapped Parking" and that the correct term is "Disabled Parking".
 

donepearce

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I do not think any ill was intended by the use of the term "handicapped people" in the thread title.

It reminded me of the experience I had years ago when I used to work in the sign industry. We were instructed that accessible parking spaces were no longer to be called "Handicapped Parking" and that the correct term is "Disabled Parking".

This is exactly what I'm talking about. Give it a few weeks and you will find that Disabled is an unacceptable word and it has to be Challenged.
 

SatansGwitar

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how-to-handle-a-child-who-has-been-sexually-abused.jpg
Financial-Assistance-for-Disabled-Adults-and-Families-6-Great-Resources-iStock-605759166-1-765x555.jpg
new-slide-5.jpg
custody-officers-at-cops-and-kids-event.jpg

images

Here are a few examples of legally protected classes of people.

the headliner reads "Ethnic Minority" what does a picure of a "Child", "Disabled", "Blind", "Police", "Elderly" have to do with ethnicity? I am asking, because I am a minority and am curious to that assessment.
 

donepearce

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Was that last one elderly? I'm 70 and I don't feel I have been placed in any special category. But I certainly don't feel that ethnic minority should be any kind of special category. It is just a description of where you were born and has no impact on any special requirements, abilities or disabilities. It definitely falls into the - that's interesting, but so what? - category.
 

Biddlin

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But I certainly don't feel that ethnic minority should be any kind of special category.
Would you feel different if you were African-American trying to vote in Georgia?
 

Go Nigel Go

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Those are all examples of groups of people who are afforded some measure of "special protection" under the law. The list is not exhaustive (there are many others), and not all are afforded the same kinds of "protections", but that was the intent of the photos in the post you quoted.
 

Biddlin

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No. I would be desperate to not be put in a special category. Identical treatment to everyone else would be my dream.
What would your chances of achieving that dream have been before 1965?
 

Biddlin

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Zero. And they clearly aren't much better now.
33440.jpeg
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Congressional black caucus 1970-------------------------------------2020 A long ways yet to go. Note the late John Lewis in both photos.
 


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