Intermediate in help with improving my soloing

Discussion in 'Lessons & Techniques' started by fcjc, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. 1Way

    1Way Active Member

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    I agree with about everything said. I find that growing as a guitarist is a lot like personal health care. There is no magic silver bullet that solves everything, there is no “best training regimen” because what works great for some may not work well for others. For myself, I “need” to first settle the current financial mess I’m in because of juggling too many variables. Then I will seek personal support and encouragement as I approach the task of daily practicing to become a better guitarist. The sooner the better...

    Recording is good
    I will likely end up recording plenty of my current guitar playing abilities, so that I can more accurately check myself as I improve. Which in turn will help me better judge about the various strategies and practice techniques that give me the best results for my personal goals.

    Stick with it. Make learning and practicing as enjoyable as possible without compromising the work and dedication involved. I think you’ll find that the more you or someone else knows your situation better, the more accurate and specific the advice will likely become.

    I know that one thing has helped me more than I even realize yet :lol:, is using a lick learner. I use my Tascam GT-1 for CD’s and it’s very cool, especially when you loop that tough part! It’s a sonic magnifying glass big time. I have probably 2 dozen educational videos and books with CD’s, some of which have lots to offer when I’m ready to dig in, but I believe that some sort of lick learner is going to become indispensable in my learning some things. There are great software one’s too.

    Concerning your guitar playing growth, you’re large and in charge. If you want it to work out, you will find a way. ;) I’m growing out my hair, I’m that dedicated to the process! LOL!
     
  2. Stareater

    Stareater Active Member

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    Actually, I don't find it cheesy at all. I don't have a Tascam, but I purchased Riffster for my computer and it's great. No matter how good your ear is, there are those times where a lick or lead is just way too fast to nail at full speed. I have the unfortunate mindset of having to nail cover songs note-for-note, and that's virtually impossible to do with some songs at normal speed. Matter of fact, I just used it to nail Wolf Hoffman's solo on Accept's "Midnight Mover" (wasn't all that tough, but there were a few parts in it that needed slowing down to hear clearly) and Jim Matheos' first solo in the opening minute of Fates Warning's "Anarchy Divine", which was impossible to decipher at full speed correctly.
     
  3. tpa

    tpa Active Member

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    Moving from intermediate to good requires personal dedication to succeed. Just like any other crisis of life. Work with technical skills as recommend above - but don't forget musicality and personal style. Try as much as possible and listen carefully and memorize how it sounds. No doubt that a systematic approach pays off. Taking lessons can increase efficiency of the learning proces, so if it really matters to you: consider taking lessons.
     
  4. Stareater

    Stareater Active Member

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    Taking lessons isn't paying someone to tell you what to do. You're paying for the expertise of your teacher, who is teaching you the foundation you need to be a better player. You don't pay $50 an hour for somebody to teach you a Green Day song. You're learning things in a proper manner, in a way that will improve your playing the quickest. You need to crawl and walk before you run, and a good guitar teacher will show you how to be a stronger musician.

    Teaching yourself songs and methods is a great and fun thing, but if you don't take the time and effort to learn and grasp the things at the base of guitar playing, you won't improve beyond a certain level. If you know one scale in one spot and go out and play with another guitarist who knows his scales and keys and root notes and notes on the neck, you'll get embarrassed by his skill.

    Again, I'd put the "I don't want to learn from nobody else and be told what to play" attitude aside and seriously look into lessons. In the long run, you'll be happier that you did and will be a better player for it. You'll be amazed at how learning things in the necessary order and a little structure in your practice routine will improve you playing.
     
  5. Metal God

    Metal God Member

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    www.jguitar.com is an excellent website with a lot of scales, i bet you wont use 90% of it, but its got everything in there, good for finding chords too. 8)
     
  6. Stareater

    Stareater Active Member

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    Finger studies are great technique builders too. They help in improving your picking, fingering, speed, and alternating between strings. There are a bunch of different ones, but a good one I've always used is called 'The Spider'. There seems to be a million different versions of it, but here's the one I know:

    Start this one at the first fret on the A string, and it covers a span of four frets throughout the exercise. Using alternate picking and starting with a downstroke, play the first & second frets (Bb & B) of the A string, then the third & fourth frets (G &Ab) of the low E string, then the 1st & 2nd frets(F &F#) of the low E string, then the third & fourth frets(C & Db). Follow this pattern across the strings until you end on the fourth fret (Ab) of the high E string.

    Now, reverse the pattern starting from the fourth fret (Ab) of the high E string (you pick this note twice - last note on the way up and again to start going back down). Now the pattern goes fourth & third fret(Ab & G) on the high E string, second & first fret(Db & C) on the B string, fourth & third fret(Eb & D) on the B string, and second & first fret(F# & F) on the high E string. Again, run this pattern across the board, ending on the first fret(Bb) of the A string.

    Work with your metronome and keep the exercise in one spot until you get comfortable with it, and then start moving it up the neck. Once you get it down, run it up to the 12th fret. It's a great technique exercise and helps you build skill in so many areas.
     
  7. erik

    erik Member

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    I would suggest doing a good amount of finger excercises excercises each day. I really do notice the difference they make, one piece of advice is to use a metronome when doing them. I really like the excercise Stareater posted. Also do what others said and try to learn the penatonic and the major scale. Also try to get in at least a half hour to 45 minutes a day of practice. Recently i have been trying to get in anywhere from 3-5 hours a day..but thats just because i have the time :p.
     
  8. skidshark

    skidshark Active Member

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    #1 thing that helps me improve......

    HANG YOU GUITAR ON THE WALL! put it where you can grab it at a moments notice on a whim and not worry about having to put it up. i leave mine hooked to the amp most of the time too.
     
  9. Stareater

    Stareater Active Member

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    Leaving your guitar on the wall is a surefire way to avoid bad solos, anyway. ;D
     
  10. skidshark

    skidshark Active Member

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    well...at least i LOOK like i know how to play!! (got the poster wid all the chords on the wall too!
     
  11. Stareater

    Stareater Active Member

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    :funny:

    See Skids, when I play something that sounds bad, I just tell everyone it's the live improv version off a rare import album. Even if it's an original. ;) ;D
     
  12. erik

    erik Member

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    [quote author=Stareater link=topic=3999.msg115305#msg115305 date=1150547781]
    :funny:

    See Skids, when I play something that sounds bad, I just tell everyone it's the live improv version off a rare import album. Even if it's an original. ;) ;D
    [/quote]

    ;D
     
  13. 1Way

    1Way Active Member

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    STAREATER!!! :?


    Good one!
     
  14. leopardstar

    leopardstar New Member

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    try thinking of your soloing as a converstion, ask a question with one line then answer it the next, see since i can't sing for the love of mike, i use my guitar to do my singing 8)
     
  15. Bonfire

    Bonfire Active Member

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    yeah, i love playing the 'question and answer' phrases, ahh soo good, you sound like such a pro lol
     

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