Music theory gurus! I am in need of aid!

frankd

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I would like to read Wolfs bio myself. reading on Pagey right now. Not dogging theory
or proper learning of anything just saying as ALI once said when it comes to Champions in life boxing
or any other art skill {THE WILL MUST OUTWEIGH THE SKILL}
And those vids were just making a point on how complex just picking alone can be or get its all
up to the individual and how deep they do or don't want to delve.
 

jtcnj

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"From everything take what is useful; discard the rest"
And even that may change as your perspective changes on this road.
I know mine has / is / does.
 

Goldmember

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Forget the heavy metal book for a bit and look at the two pdf's below. If you need some theory and serious practice the book at the bottom might be for you. Don't laugh, it has Mary had a little lamb as an exercise. That bottom book taught me more than many hours with some guitar instructors. They gave me the background and that cheap book put it all together.

http://www.bibotu.com/books/2011/Guitar lessons and books/Fretboard Roadmaps - Rock.pdf




http://docslide.us/documents/fretboard-roadmaps-blues-guitarpdf.html



Lastly, is a link to a cheap book. Is is worth many times the selling price. It looked simple until I started to work my way thorough the book. It covers chord progressions and altered chords.
It has the most useable and understandable description of the cycle of fifths - yes that mysterious circle with chord names around it. This book unlocked the secret of the cycle and lays it out in a diagram. And yes, more advanced chord progression can be laid out on the diagrams.

It also has some useful scale exercises.

The above two books and this one have much in common and there are differences. This is the book I would use to learn overall guitar theory.

Please note that the above two books do not appear to have the cycle of fifth explanation.

https://www.amazon.com/Fretboard-Roadmaps-Essential-Patterns-Techniques/dp/0793520886


@Westernrider: Thanks for taking the time to post these links. I can really use these resources!
 

Westernrider

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Hey Goldmember,

The bottom book, the one in the Amazon link, covers basic fret board layout, chords and moveable chords, progressions, examples of chord melody parts, and moveable scales. It looks like a simple beginners book at first. Start going thorough it page by page and following directions. It will take some time and effort.

It just isn't a metal book. The author shows one progression and names several songs that use it. You play it a few times and ask yourself - what happens if I move the chords up a few frets? Then you make the move. Your SG should be tuned and ready. Now, you have the main chords to War Pigs.

Side Note
The first Metallica album has lots of Pentatonics. They are your friend and have many colors and moods. You take the minor or blues sale and move it three frets and you now have a major scale.


Seriously, over the years, I have tried to learn how to use the cycle of fifths. Mostly, it was an incomprehensible mess to me. The author laid out the cycle of fifths. This was the instant the cycle and more complex chord progressions fell in place. It helped me tremendously - ear training, figuring out song structure, and improvising.

The book helped me conquer Disraeli Gears by Cream and parts of the first Experience album - just for fun - listen to Hey Joe and follow the chords and Lemon Song by Zep. These songs aren't metal and there is a whole world of music waiting for you.




Saints and sinners, there are better songs, these are just great tunes to play.



What will it do for you?
Really hope the book helps you.
 

jjudas

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Hey, I'm struggling with the same stuff. I play by ear, I had minimal lessons years ago. I play metal. I keep watching YouTube videos and practicing scales and improvising.
 

Heket

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I was going to say something, but Kerry said it all :) The chord numbering system he is referring to is called the Nashville Numbers system, very useful to learn if you're ever going to go out jamming, or maybe auditioning or depping.

They key of the song - yeah, it's all a bit of a feel based thing, there are actually no hard and fast rules because music isn't like that. The key, chord number 1, is what other chords want to resolve to, especially at the end. It's also extremely common in the rock/blues axis to start on chord 1 too. You could try learning diatonic harmony, this will tell you what key you're in by the flavour (major, minor etc) of the chords that are being played, but I reckon in metal there's going to be a lot of non-diatonic stuff.
 

Raiyn

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Speaking of the Nashville Numbers,
This came up in my YouTube feed a few weeks ago.

Scott's not for everyone, he can be abrasive, but he knows his ish.
 

smitty_p

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Why is he calling this Nashville Numbers. This is absolutely standard interval numbering. I'm pretty sure it was used before Nashville was a twinkle in its mummy's eye.

You are correct. The Nashville numbering system derives directly from the standard interval numbering. It doesn't change that. The Nashville numbering system adds a few shorthand symbols.

Here is a pretty good description.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_number_system
 

AlpineWhite

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When it comes to music theory, I am as dumb as a screen door on a submarine.

How in the book of heavy metal, do you tell what key a song is in? Also would this require knowing the notes on the fretboard on a first and last name basis?... Cause me and notes pass each other on the sidewalk and give each other an acknowledging nod but never spoke a word to each other... But we know that each other exist.


Check this guy out on youtube. JustNickMusic Start with this video of his....it helped me alot and made it alot more fun to sit in with others and jam. After watching this video, I could sit there and find the key and the changes with my volume down, then turn it up and add some notes in time and on key.....Let me know if it helps
 

bobbiehart2013

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I was in your shoes and I bought the book, HOW TO READ MUSIC Fundamentals of Music Notation Made Easy by Roger Evans among others. I love the theory end of music as much as anything else. Unless you were born with the natural musical talent of Mick Taylor I would highly recommend learning the theory. It opens up a whole new world of peasure in my opinion.
 

Paul G.

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I have played in a band with someone who was a great player but knew no theory at all. He couldn't name the notes of a scale. Had no idea how to play any chords. It was very frustrating for him and the rest of the band. The band would have to play a song a few times, then he could play it. He was almost a savant. Where the problem came in was if you changed the key of the song he would have to relearn the song. If you said something like maybe we should play a 7th chord here he would just get a blank look on his face. He could play rings around me when we were jamming but eventually he was asked to leave the band because it was too frustrating putting together a set of songs rather than jams.

That's why I usually prefer to play with keys rather than a second guitarist. Keyboard players tend to have some training/knowledge. Whatever music you're playing, it's so nice to be able to communicate in words or hand gestures what to do and have it happen. I've slogged through rehearsals with guitarists where you have to show them everything. Even then it takes a long time, because without knowing what you're doing and why, it's hard to remember, so you just do it again, and again, and again….

Old Joke: How do you get a guitar player to shut up? Put sheet music in front of him. How do you get a piano player to shut up? Take his sheet music away.

P
 

Sp8ctre

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I took Music Theory 101 at Berkley School of Music and I understand a lot of it...I know the Circle of Fiths (and Fourths) and I can read the notes in a song book. I understand the chord progressions and all the Major, Minor, 5th, 7th, Suspended...etc...

However it has not helped me one bit when trying to translate what I learned from a book on paper to the guitar when I sit and play it. I have yet to be able to figure out what key a song is in by listening to it. I can't figure out where to move my notes to change key or any such thing. I still play by using TAB almost exclusively.

It is very daunting to sit through 12 weeks of a class and still not be able to transcribe what you learned to the actual instrument you play. It almost made me want to give up...
 

jtees4

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When it comes to music theory, I am as dumb as a screen door on a submarine.

How in the book of heavy metal, do you tell what key a song is in? Also would this require knowing the notes on the fretboard on a first and last name basis?... Cause me and notes pass each other on the sidewalk and give each other an acknowledging nod but never spoke a word to each other... But we know that each other exist.


"I am as dumb as a screen door on a submarine"...never heard that one but just love it! And if they have a screen door, hopefully no one will leave it open :facepalm:
 


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