Nitro damage

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Goldfingerz, Dec 26, 2020.

  1. Goldfingerz

    Goldfingerz New Member

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    I will give that some thought, most are closed at present for the holidays, agree though they know what they are doing, thanks
     
  2. Goldfingerz

    Goldfingerz New Member

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  3. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    From what I have seen over the years, the factory always installs them as I explained earlier. In this case I saw right off the bat the flat side of the saddles were facing the incorrect direction and upon closer inspection saw that the notches on the saddles did not correspond with the correct string size. That's the most important part.

    There's no reason to ever flip a Nashville bridge. A new one without notches would still get installed so that the flat side of the saddles face the nut and the screws would end up facing the tailpiece. Why would someone go through the trouble to remove a bunch of saddles without notches to flip the screws the other direction? Makes no sense to me.

    I have even seen a wraparound bridge flipped backwards recently on a thread here.
    Here it is in link below.

    https://www.everythingsg.com/threads/gibson-sg-junior-missing-logo.37493/
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2020
  4. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    ScotchBite on back of neck only.
    Never any other area of the guitar.
    I use it to knock down the sticky neck syndrome.
    Then went back over it with Virtuoso Polish.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    May have been a Friday afternoon guitar.
    Someone not paying attention.
    It happens.

    Usually the flat sides of the saddles face the nut when possible. Sometimes individual saddles have to be flipped on an ABR-1 if running out of room for adjustment.

    With the ABR-1 the screws sit higher on the edge of the bridge. Having the screws face the tailpiece increase the chances of the strings hitting the screw heads because of the string break angle. With a Nashville, the screws sit lower from the edge of the bridge and this is not an issue.

    It may be why one faces one way and the other faces the other. It doesn't matter to me if someone wants to deviate from the way the factory installs parts. It's just an observation.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2020
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  6. pancake81

    pancake81 Well-Known Member

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    Normally I would agree with you, but on the AY custom shops this just seems to be the way, certainly the way mine came from the factory, as well as all the others I have seen posted. Including solo dallas’s. Angus also seems to run his ABR’s this way, for whatever reason..?

    my 61RI is as you mentioned, some saddles haven flipped for more adjustment room. But most have the flat facing the nut.

    61RI, with some saddles flipped

    [​IMG]

    other photos of AY Custom shops
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    solo Dallas Personal AYCS
    [​IMG]

    Angus guitar from the rig rundown
    [​IMG]



     
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  7. pancake81

    pancake81 Well-Known Member

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    Here is another photo of both the VOS and aged new in store. Both appear to have screws facing the tailpiece.

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Since those are signature guitars, that would make sense. I’ve seen some signature guitars where they drill extra holes on the back of the headstock to make it look like tuners were swapped out.

    Funny how they concentrate on details like that but can’t be bothered to build reissues closer to original specs.
     
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  9. Goldfingerz

    Goldfingerz New Member

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    That looks nicer than mine, it's pretty drastic what I have done, gaslty even, I don't like satin black at all, good idea to now polish the neck with Virtuoso equivalent Music Nomad The Guitar One that I have, thanks
     
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  10. Goldfingerz

    Goldfingerz New Member

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    Yes interesting, I think most screws face the tailpiece, whatever is easy for access eh
     
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  11. Goldfingerz

    Goldfingerz New Member

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    Yes indeed thanks
     
  12. Goldfingerz

    Goldfingerz New Member

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    Yes horses for courses. On another note, you may have noticed I installed the Gibson Future Tribute Les Paul chrome knurled knobs, great grip, easy access, chrome to chrome too. I didn't like the Top Hat knobs that came with the guitar, no grip, too slippery for fast adjustment in performance. A friend of mine has the original early 60's Witch's Hats knobs which are slightly taller and have grooves for greater grip. Not sure Gibson doesn't use them, the top hats are clumsy in my opinion. Speed knobs are too large for an SG in my view, too close together being so large. SG pots are closer together than in Les Pauls I think
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2020
  13. Goldfingerz

    Goldfingerz New Member

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    2011 GIBSON SG 7 small.jpg
     
  14. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    That finish may look cloudy now, but I'm thinking you should be able to buff that out with some patience.
     
  15. Goldfingerz

    Goldfingerz New Member

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    I got the gear! I bought a pack of buffing wheels, charge up the drill and the courage haha. I've got some cut and polish combined, will start with that gently and try to find instruction tips videos on Youtube before starting. BUFF WHEELS small.jpg
     
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  16. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Be aware of temperature with powered buffing. A fraction too long in one spot and the lacquer starts to soften. When that happens the friction increases hugely and the temperature rockets. Then you get to strip the whole guitar and start from scratch.
     
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  17. Goldfingerz

    Goldfingerz New Member

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    Better Finish small.jpg
    I used the power drill at a slow speed and not long on any one spot. The buffing wheel with cut plus polish using the drill, then by hand has removed the nasty blemishes, I'm very happy they are gone. It is not perfect but the guitar is 10 years old so that's ok with me. At least it looks presentable now. Sure I could strip down the guitar parts and do the whole body but I'm ok with it the way it is.
    Thanks so much for all the advice.
     
  18. Von Trapp

    Von Trapp Well-Known Member

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    Good show
     
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  19. Bobby

    Bobby New Member

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  20. Reuben

    Reuben New Member

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    When I finish a guitar with lacquer it is wet sanded from 800grit to 2000grit. I don't think that is the "go to first strategy" for your issue and may be viable after you try other things.

    To reach the mirror-like finish I use three liquid polishing compounds...Meguires medium and fine cut..mostly the find cut.. I finish with auto plastic headlight restoration polish (much finer than "fine cut"). All this is done with a drill with foam polishing wheels (different grades..medium->high polish). The finishes come out like glass. If, in deed, your finish is lacquer...You could possibly get some Mohawk lacquer reducer spray. This will totally level the finish (just like it was just sprayed on). A few quick passes over the surface (laying flat) and you would be amazed how quick it works...and dries fast. I had a few "runs" in a Telecaster finish and after two quick spray passes...totally flat and glass-like.

    I would start with the liquid polishing med -> fine with a "light" hand buffing...use microfiber cloths (alway watching the corners/bevels to make sure you don't grind the finish away. This is not hard to do, but you should do some research on finishing guitars... Feel free to ask any questions. I'm in the process of building an SG Custom guitar.

    Reuben
     
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