Relic SG ?

Discussion in 'eBay Deals' started by DrBGood, Nov 23, 2017.

  1. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    If you're buying guitars as financial investments, you're doing it wrong.
     
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  2. sgpenguin

    sgpenguin Member

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    Agreed, but there's plenty who treat the name on the headstock as an investment. I have those conversations all the time about Epiphone vs Gibson, Squier vs Fender, so I just point out McCartney's £100 Hofner and apparently that's an unfair comparison :rolleyes:
     
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  3. Plan Zero

    Plan Zero Active Member

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    Gibson calls their own "investments" haha. I think I read it on the back of some Gibson knobs or owner's manual about protecting your investment. Marketing in this way softens the blow to your wallet I suppose. If i were ever to shell out the dough for a new Gibson you'd better believe that puppy better be mint.
    Fender was in the relic game first, and those that came out almost 20 years ago are not holding value next to their non-relic american counterparts. But I agree if your buying anything "collectable" as an "investment" nowadays you can't ever expect it to appreciate like something that's old now. The only reason 50 year old guitars (or anything for that matter) are worth so much is the rarity. 50 years from now the plethora of mint condition, never played guitars will be ridiculous.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2017
  4. SG standard

    SG standard Well-Known Member

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    Gibson might just be using the term in the sense of 'invest in a good instrument, look after it, and it will give you a lifetime of service', (rather like investing time in practicing with it - you don't get more time back in return). But of course, that's being generous to Gibson's marketing department - and however they meant it, many will take the implication that their Gibson is some kind of financial investment. ;)

    Absolutely agree with that last sentence. But a new guitar can be a short-term investment; if you buy a Gibson at 40% clearance price, you can often sell it for more within months, I know as I've inadvertently done this a few times recently. It's a small return, but it's nice to play an instrument for 6 months and then get an extra £100 back on your outlay.... I mean 'investment'. :)
    By contrast, it's quite a challenge to find an older instrument that represents a sure-fire 'investment' in either long or short-term: Most owners know the value or have an inflated idea of it, and there's little sign that most of the market is going up, as far as I can tell. If anything, I suspect the vintage market will start to saturate as inherited guitar collections increasingly get sold off.
     
  5. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    I've been preaching that for quite a while, this is the first I've seen someone come to the same conclusion on their own.
    :cheers:
     
  6. sgpenguin

    sgpenguin Member

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    They'll just shift the goalposts to something else to maintain the "scarcity".
     
  7. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    Probably. Something stupid too.


    I'm not worried about what my guitar's going to be worth in 30 years. I'm more interested in the enjoyment value. If I'm having fun with it, that's all that matters to me. If I decide to modify something, it's for my own enjoyment.
     
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  8. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Exactly, it's a tool to have fun with or to make a living. Either way, it's YOUR tool and it should fit your needs the best it can.
     
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  9. Plan Zero

    Plan Zero Active Member

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    Many good points are being made here. I discovered the whole problem of worth when I was a kid collecting comic books. The long term value of anything collectible nowadays will be limited to the truly unique (like a manufacturing defect) or limited to the immediate demand value which is almost always short lived. I spend a chunk of my day looking for deals and reselling on eBay. That's my side hustle. The Internet (specifically online marketplaces- eBay, amazon, Walmart.com) opens many windows for unbelievable one time deals on a daily basis, and I'm able to buy stuff considerably cheaper than I paid 20 years ago. Take my $52 SG as a prime example. Normally $160. Not something I plan to find again, and you'd better believe if I knew about this forum I would've scooped up a handful and resold them here.
    Unfortunately I am not a great musician. To the casual observer I know what I'm doing but in all honesty my set list consists of a bunch of punk and metal rhythms. I don't have the mental discipline to learn properly. I've worked in the recording industry, the instrument industry, hell even my BA is in music business. But Im really just a poseur. So I involuntarily focus on the product, the instrument at hand and relish it for what it is. I display my guitars like works of art because they are.
     
  10. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    One that I think "might" make it to collectors level is the Epiphone TV Yellow LP Special 1 with P90. Like some of today's Holy Grails, the SG Juniors of 60 so years ago, that was a beginner's guitar and sold for peanuts. A lot of them were probably discarded in the garbage bin, when the kid couldn't learn. So out of the plethora that came out of Gibson's plant, only a few made it to our days and they are worth a lot.
     
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  11. Plan Zero

    Plan Zero Active Member

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    I'd like to think my Maestro SG will have the same quirky appeal. The original Gibson Jr's (and melody makers) were meant as stripped down, one pickup, affordable "student" guitars. AFAIK the $400 price tag on the cheapest Gibby SG fusion is not student nor beginner friendly. Most commoners don't even know epiphone makes cheap Gibsons, hence the marketing of a handful of Maestro ("by Gibson" on the headstock) instruments on a music education angle. I'd like to say my Maestro is Gibson's 2017 offering of a true Junior model, in spirit and price.

    It's funny you mention that guitar, I was just looking at the faded black open box for $87!
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2017
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  12. DrBGood

    DrBGood Well-Known Member

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    Get it, you won't regret it. Everybody that got one, love it.
    Had mine for 4 or 5 years, and still play it daily.
     
  13. Raiyn

    Raiyn Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    I've been making the comic book comparison for some time now! It's nice to see it coming from someone else!
     
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  14. drown

    drown Well-Known Member

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    DADGUM?? I haven't hear of that tuning?
     

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