SG players that made you choose the SG

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Dagger, Feb 7, 2020.

  1. Dagger

    Dagger Member

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    Alright we have the obvious ones Tony Iommy , Angus Young , Pete Townsend
    But for me with punk/hardcore it was Joey shithead Keithley (DOA) Greg Hetson (Bad Religion Circle Jerks) Ian mckaye (Minor Threat) but more (Fugazi) he didn't play guitar in minor threat. I think a lot of hardcore/ punk bands in the 80s used a lot of 70s Norlin era SGs and Lps because no one wanted em Van Halen and super shredder guitarists were all the hype and the super strat guitars with double locking floating Floyd Rose trems were all the rage so these punk rocker kids got their SGs and Lps on the cheap and rocked the hell outta em! "And just so ya know I do like Tony, Angus and Pete just thought it would be fun to hear of some others"
     
  2. Astral Traveler

    Astral Traveler Active Member

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    When I think of an SG I always see it in the hands of Frank Zappa.

    A more recent guitstist he's great that plays an SG is Max from The Main Squeeze, I really like his style.



     
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  3. Gahr

    Gahr Well-Known Member

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    I don't think one single player made me choose the SG, but quite a few of the players I listened to as a kid played SGs, and I guess they all made me aware of it. I liked it for the looks, and when I first played one, I fell in love.
    The SG players that inspired me the most as a kid were Eric Clapton, Angus Young, Dickey Betts, Duane Allman and Mick Taylor.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2020
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  4. NMA

    NMA Well-Known Member

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    Wasn't a popular, guitar God like Angus or Krieger. It was Justin Sullivan from the cult band New Model Army (thus my user name here NMA) that made me get myself an SG.

    That band (often compared to The Clash) has been in existence for 40 years and Sullivan ALWAYS uses an SG. That's incredible. 40 professional years, one guitar.

    In the early years he often used those Norlin era SGs. I think this one in this video is a Norlin SG:

     
  5. Dagger

    Dagger Member

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    I guess I shouldn't have said choose maybe influence. I must admit as a kid I had seen plenty of them in music videos but it wasn't until I saw one up close at the local music store that I had to have it, the next day I traded my Mexican strat for an Korean epiphone and never looked back! It was light weight handled everything I through at it the humbuckers were a definite improvement over the straits single coils for the music I was playing "still playing". As I got older and better jobs I upgraded to a Gibson. But those old Korean samick plant epiphones were made very well.
     
  6. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    I still have and use my Epiphone SG. I've bought many other guitars since, including Gibson Les Paul and PRS McCarty 58, but I have no interest in "improving" my SG to a Gibson. As far as I am concerned it remains perfect.
     
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  7. eugene

    eugene New Member

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    Angus of course.
     
  8. Dagger

    Dagger Member

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    I still play epiphones as well but I no longer have the Korean one. I have a Chinese g400 and it sucks compared to my old Korean one.
     
  9. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    I might be one of the few musicians on these boards
    who was never interested in (or influenced by) Angus Young or Tony Iommi.
    *laughs

    Probably 'cause I'm older'n dirt. I'd heard of ACDC and
    Black Sabbath, but never listened to them or knew who the members were (or what they played). Funny, I've been a
    member of this forum since '09, and I still would never say
    the word "Iommi"
    among wise guys, because I don't know how to pronounce it. And I don't want to sound like a fool
    or an ignoramus.

    I have asked publicly on this forum twice, and no one has
    responded. Maybe they couldn't believe that I don't know how say it. But I don't. Is is Eye-ah-mee? I don't think I've
    ever heard anyone actually say the word. And I've been listening (with at least one ear), just so I don't sound like
    a fool or an ignoramus.

    I even bought Tony Iommi's book... Iron Man, to add to my rock an roll collection. He writes well and tells it like it was.
    But he never tells us how to say his name.

    Shrugs. Someone will take me aside and school me, even at
    my advanced age. And once I learn I will remember.
     
  10. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Pleasure to help. Eye-oh-me. And I am also one of those few.
     
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  11. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Don. I would have made a fool of myself
    in public for sure if I had said it wrong.

    My attraction to the SG goes back to about 1964.
    I was like sixteen. I had recently learned to play the
    guitar, and was absorbing influences from everything
    I could listen to... Including Wes Montgomery, Bob Shane,
    Buddy Holly, John Lennon, James Jamerson (though I didn't
    know his name yet), Duck Dunn, Steve Cropper, (though I
    didn't know their names yet), The Ventures *grins and
    Johhny Rivers.

    So I went to this party. I heard they had a band. I wanted to
    be in a band, but couldn't play well enough yet. So I went to
    observe and see how it was done. The guitar player had a
    Gibson, one that I'd never seen. I thought of Gibsons as expensive Jazz guitars, too rich for the likes of me. The bass
    player had a Fender bass, I knew about those. I was interested in playing bass, but I didn't like this bass player's style. He was so tense and rigid that he made me feel tense and rigid just watching him.

    But the guitar player's Gibson fascinated me. I didn't know what it was. I'd heard of Les Paul, but thought of him as
    yesterday's music. I'd heard "How High the Moon" on my crackly tube radio in the fifties when I was a schoolboy.
    Squaresville, man. But the guitar player in this "cool band"
    that was probably playing for a hundred bucks and practiced in someone's garage, was playing a Gibson I'd never seen before. This was not my grandfather's Gibson, or my father's Gibson. It was red, it was red hot, it had the most rebellious tone I'd ever heard (although I had no words to describe what I was hearing). I knew about Strats and Telecasters, they were cool. I knew about Ricks and Gretsches because the Beatles played them. But I thought those were from Germany, like the Hofner and the Ludwig drums. I thought they got all their gear in Hamburg, along with their leather jackets. *grins

    I didn't know jack. But I was fascinated by this red Gibson
    with the curves and the bevels, and fascinated by the tone.
    I cain't recall what amp the guitarist was using, because I
    kept staring at that Gibson. I think it was a Fender Deluxe
    because I can still remember the red jewel in the dark of the party. The guy took a break, and went to get a beer and... he set his Gibson on a guitar stand. Maybe I'd never
    seen one of those either, but I thought it was the coolest way to set your Gibson down. He put his amp on Standby
    which I also thought was extra cool. I couldn't take my eyes off that guitar.

    Well, the young kernel was smitten. But I never stole that one... (I might have thought about it) and I never bought one for my self for a long time. In 1964, The Doors hadn't
    started releasing albums yet, nor had the Grateful Dead.
    Who might have been playing an SG? George Harrison maybe.
     
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  12. clint

    clint New Member

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    No player influenced me to choose an SG. When I first bought one, I didn't know what an SG was or what bands used them. I was looking to replace my Lotus Les Paul copy (I didn't know what a Les Paul was either) with a better quality guitar. I tried a cheap SG and really liked the feel and tone, so I bought one.

    But today, if I were to be influenced by anyone to buy an SG, it would probably be someone like Frank Marino or Derek Trucks.
     
  13. 67King

    67King Member

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    Exhibit A: [​IMG]

    Exhibit B: [​IMG]

    I got my first SG exclusively for slide work. A little bit higher action, and tuned to open E. Second one I got for various reasons. I guess if anything, Carlos Santana would be a third. But I'm not into the harder stuff like AC/DC or Black Sabbath, at least as far as influence goes.
     
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  14. GrumpyOldDBA

    GrumpyOldDBA Well-Known Member

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    Angus and Derek Trucks first maybe ha ha plus Clapton ...
     
  15. Kerry Brown

    Kerry Brown Well-Known Member

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    Carlos Santana back in the 60's and 70's. I bought my first SG, a Japanese clone, back in the late 60's. I wish I had it now. I traded it in on a MIJ acoustic which I do still have. It needs a neck reset but it is a very nice sounding acoustic.
     
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  16. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    The Doors first recording came out in 1966, and
    this was immediately my music. I liked this band
    much better than other sixties groups, they really
    raised the bar for everyone.

    The Who was playing way back then, and they had
    an excellent tough sound, driven by Pete Townshend playing many guitars, but his best tone was with one of those SG specials IMHO. Even so... Robbie Krieger was my
    first SG guitar gawd. And so he remains to this day.
    Plenty of other great SG players, but he's unique IMHO.

    At that time, The Grateful Dead were using SGs, I know Jerry Garcia had one. So he came next. Then the Muthuhs of Invention, with Frank Zappa, very strange indeed. I'm listing
    them in the rough order that I became aware of them, but I
    was a college guy in the midwest, preoccupied with the sexual revolution and the opposition to the War, so those
    bands were probably well established on the East or West
    coast before I ever heard of them.

    A year or so later, Big Brother and the Holding Co.
    came on the scene with Janis Joplin as lead singer.
    They all played SGs. I thought they were cool too.
    Then Cream, with Eric Clapton and the Fool SG,
    who had a sound like no one else. I can still listen to
    that sound, all these years later. I can still see Jimi
    Hendix playing one if I close my eyes, but I always thought
    it looked weird, upside down.

    ...and then Carlos Santana, at Woodstock. I didn't go, but
    I have always loved his music, and I feel that he had excellent tone with his SG P-90 special. He can play a PRS or what, he still sounds like himself, still chasing that SG tone.

    Early 70s it was Allman Brothers, who played mostly Les
    Pauls, but Duane had an SG, and he could rip with it.

    For me, in the middle seventies, it was Buck Dharma with
    Blue Oyster Cult. Another totally unique band and sound.
    I like a lot of other '70s music too, but much of that was
    Les Paul driven. The '70s image is of a big hair rocker
    with a Les Paul, boots on the front monitor, very slow slung
    guitar.... screaming groupers.

    But when I first became a fan of the SG, there were no monitors. No pedals either. Just plug yer SG into yer Fender Deluxe and turn it up. They might have had some side fills, if it was a pro stage setup. But that SG raw rebellion just gets in my blood.
     
  17. koaguilds

    koaguilds Well-Known Member

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    Yes Buck Dharma on his white SG or even his Les Paul's was always an amazing performer. He should have routinely ranked way up there on the best guitarist lists.
     
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  18. Clifdawg

    Clifdawg Well-Known Member

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    Don’t get me wrong, I love watching Angus tear through “Thunderstruck” on an SG as much as the next guy, but I don’t think there was any one person that really inspired me to play one. I will say that I was a big Switchfoot fan in high school and college (still am, tbh), and at the time (when Nothing is Sound and Oh! Gravity. were their most recently-released records), Jon Foreman used an SG a lot, so maybe that imagery was stuck with me from going to concerts.

    Still, the look of the guitar alone was what caught my eye initially, and, when I bought an Epiphone, the feel is what made me fall in love. I bought a Gibson SG and never looked back (and got it in sunburst specifically so it wouldn’t bring Angus or Iommi to mind every time I pulled it out).

    In retrospect, I think the images of Sister Rosetta Tharpe slinging an SG are what made me realize that the SG is a guitar for everyone, not just rock and metal fans. :thumb:
     
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  19. skydog6653

    skydog6653 Member

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  20. Tiboy

    Tiboy Member

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    Billy Pisano. You never heard of him because he was a childhood friend. I had a no name guitar and amp from the local store where we poor people shopped. He had an SG. He let me play it. I never forgot. Fast forward into my 50’s and I’m not a poor kid anymore. So I bought an SG. Tony and Angus who?
     

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