Specs on my Gibson SG

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Jan Eriksson, Jan 27, 2021.

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  1. Jan Eriksson

    Jan Eriksson New Member

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    Hi,
    Do anyone know where i can find the specs on my Gibson SG Standard ’61 (USA but not Custom Shop) from 2010.
    /Thanks,
    /Jan
     
  2. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    There were no SG Standard '61 produced in 2010.
    Maybe you have a 2010 SG '61 Reissue.

    Does it look something like this?

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Jan Eriksson

    Jan Eriksson New Member

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    Yes, it look like that! It must be an reissue then. :)
     
  4. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Correct, SG '61 Reissue, which is a USA model.
    "Reissue" does not always refer to Custom Shop.

    Other USA models...

    SG '62 Reissue
    Flying V '67 Reissue
    Explorer '76 Reissue
     
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  5. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to ETSG, and congratulations on an
    excellent choice of guitar.

    The 2010 Gibson SG '61 ReIssue is one of the best guitars Gibson has ever made
    in my humble opinion.

    They were equipped with Gibson's '57 Classic pickups (one of the best that Gibson offers).
    Excellent tone in all frequencies. SGs and '57 Classics are made for each other IMHO.
    I installed a set in my '07 SG special and have never looked back. Love the sound. Clean sweet highs, tough and present midrange tones, deep and growly lows... hard to beat.

    Many of them were made with one piece bodies (which means nothing to tone, but is
    aesthetically pleasing to some)... But the wood selected for these models was very high
    quality. They always look beautiful. One piece mahogany necks.

    They had decorations equal to some of the finest Gibsons... once again, this is not
    important to tone, but they look lovely, which gives the player confidence. And confidence
    is what we all need onstage. A Gibson SG '61 RI is one to be proud to play.

    In short, the 2010 SG '61 RI can be the guitar of a lifetime. It's not one to use as a mod
    platform, because it's already the best. So if you mod your '61 RI, each modification should
    be considered a downgrade.

    So don't fuss over it too much... get it set up and then ROCK that sucker!
     
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  6. Jan Eriksson

    Jan Eriksson New Member

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    Thank you for your info on my SG ’61 Reissue and about the pickups. Yes, they sound good. The only upgrade (downgrade?) i am thinking of is to maybe change the Nashville bridge to a ABR-1 bridge. Just because it feel/look more genuine. But maybe i am wrong..:)
     
  7. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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  8. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    The ABR-1 Bridge was a product of the 1950s, when guitar strings came in only one gauge...
    Heavy! The ABR-1 Bridge was designed to work with heavy strings, and it doesn't have enough
    travel in the saddles to intonate lighter gauge strings. The bridge is screwed into the wood
    with no studs. Some players believe that this creates better tone. I don't.

    The Nashville Bridge is a development of the 1980s, intended to correct the flaws of the ABR-1
    and intended to look mostly like the old ones but to intonate well with more modern string gauges. Which it does. The Nashville is screwed into steel studs, intended to be more durable. Mahogany isn't really strong wood. ABR-1 might work better on a Les Paul with a maple Top.

    That's the simple language difference. But there's plenty of loyalty for the ABR-1 here.
    On this site you can read post after post concerning the virtues of the ABR-1 bridge (which to
    me seem mostly imaginary or emotional). Some of the '61 ReIssue guitars were built with
    the ABR-1 bridge and some were not. All have excellent tone. If your bridge is screwed into
    steel studs, it's a Nashville. If it's screwed right into the guitar top, it's an ABR-1.

    There might be an ABR-1 conversion bridge which will screw into your existing steel studs.
    But what's the advantage? I don't see it. My 2012 SG has a Nashville bridge which has given
    great tone and service for seven years now, totally stock. I'm happy with it. *shrugs
     
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  9. flognoth

    flognoth Active Member

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    That is once again an incorrect statement when it comes to intonation and ABR-1 bridges.

    What is correct is the Nashville does have more travel than the ABR-1 and less travel than the Harmonica.

    In my experience, I have ABR-1 bridges on all my Gibsons (non-wraparounds) - I prefer they way they feel - I use 9's and have never had an issue getting correct intonation.

    It is your guitar and your preferences, so there are no wrong answers. My advise is not to pay attention to random statements on the internet, especially when opinions are stated as fact. It is a problem here.
     
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