Thinking of getting a second SG

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by sgguitarzz, Mar 14, 2021.

  1. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    And w/my Classic in a different view before I got the White 1976 Std.
    3 SG's.jpg

    08 Classic, 05 Faded Special, 87 Special 3 knob.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2021
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  2. SweetJohnnyD

    SweetJohnnyD New Member

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    Yes, at 50 I've played thousands of gigs on my #1 SG Std from mid 80s and always thought of myself as a one guitar guy. It's so worn in to the point of even looking fragile. So last year I bought a used '19 Std. It honestly took me quite some time to get used to it but now that I am...let's just say I don't know why I waited so long. It sounds cleaner, crisp and full of life compared to #1! Life is short my friend, you need a #2 SG in your life
     
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  3. PauloQS

    PauloQS Member

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    I’m 4 for 4 with Gibson CS guitars in terms of not having to do any work on them, including the nut. With non-CS the only ones that did not need any work at the nut were the LP Special I bought from Wildwoods, a 2017 LP Standard HP, which had a titanium nut, a Gibson Studio Acoustic guitar and core USA PRS, which have molded nuts, thus no adjustment is ever needed unless you want different gauge strings. Everything else, including ESP/LTD, other Gibson USA, non-CS Fender, Martin standard series, etc. all needed some attention.


    Anyways, DIY can be daunting, but I started off with these,

    Guitar Bridge Saddle Nut Files Set - 13 Different Size Needle Files with Circular Cross Section and 9 Pcs Sand Paper For Bass, Ukulele, Acoustic & Electric Guitar nut slot polish - iLuiz https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B01LQO3...abc_P8F4BR7367BRPM5TS61D?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

    They are very gentle and are not that good if you actually want to change the action at the bridge. However, they are the best for widening the slots when strings are binding at the nut. I have the fancy nut slots file, which I use to adjust the height, but I still use these cheap ones when I want to shape the walls of the slots.
     
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  4. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    Here ya go, fixed it.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    We can't really give you advice if we have no idea what you're looking for. Do you want something similar to your '69? Or different in some way? Because a '61 style model will be quite different, especially the thin neck. '69s tend to have very thick necks.
     
  6. sgguitarzz

    sgguitarzz Member

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  7. sgguitarzz

    sgguitarzz Member

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    Well have gotten some good advice so far. I don't think my 69 SG neck is that thick but I may just be used to it. I play a wide variety of music so looking for something that can handle almost anything. I don't want anything too heavy. I just got rid of a Hamer Studio because it was too heavy like a Les Paul. I would like something more similar than not.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2021
  8. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    Try to get your hands on both a Standard and Standard '61. The '61 has a slim taper neck whereas the Standard has a rounded '50s neck that would be closer to your '69.
     
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  9. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    Just about any SG will get you a light enough guitar, sgguitarzz.

    Pretty sure there are likely more 6 3/4-7 3/4 lb SG's than there are 8+ lb ones.
    You will likely get a very comfortable one with just about any choice.
     
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  10. Wild Bill212

    Wild Bill212 Active Member

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    Spend a few extra dollars and get a STANDARD. The Specials/Jr's./Faded's all lack head-stock veneer's, Neck bindings and have inferior coloured Fret-Boards....and they usually have the least desirabel Pick-Up's.

    Although, I picked a 2015 SG Special up recently as an everyday beat the crap out of player..... and its good for that ! But, i still prefer Standard Gibson's, they are, afterall, THE STANDARD. Period.
     
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  11. Wild Bill212

    Wild Bill212 Active Member

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    OH, one other thing, whatever you do, play what you are buying un-plugged...you will find that Specials, Faded's & JR's. all have DENSER Wood than STANDARDS and generally sound lifeless and dull when played acounstically(UN-plugged)...With GIBSON, you really do get what you pay for...not that they have never made a bad STANDARD, but its up to you to pick the guitar you want to play...if you buy a turkey...thats on you, yes?
     
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  12. Wild Bill212

    Wild Bill212 Active Member

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    YES, you are correct...I had a 1979 SG Standard I thought I would never sell. Until I picked up my 2017 SG STandard which blew the strings off my '79 Standard. The '79 was sold immediately after my 2017 SG Standard arrived....I do not miss it for a second and do not like putting down the '17 SG, a frikkin CANNON It is !
    GIBSON is now making the best guitars it has ever manufactured, since 2016 I would say, which is bad news for all the old 1960's vintage owners....LMT ? $8,000.00 for a 1964 SG Standard or $1299 for my '17 SG Standard?...its not even up for consideration which one I would buy.
     
  13. sgguitarzz

    sgguitarzz Member

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    I don't have the money but even if I did I have never believed you need to spend numbers like $8000 to get a good guitar.
     
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  14. PauloQS

    PauloQS Member

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    You really don’t need a ridiculous amount of money for an amazing SG. That’s coming from someone who owns a Custom Shop SG. I think you’d be in good hands with any of the SGs of the current lineup. I have yet to play a bad one. Because you were interested in the Standard ‘61 with Maestro, I think you should go with that one, unless you find it’s not your thing when you get a chance to try one out.
     
  15. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    Headstock veneer has nothing to do with playability or sound.

    More $$$ does not always equal better guitar.

    A good guitar is a good guitar.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2021
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  16. PermissionToLand

    PermissionToLand Well-Known Member

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    LOL, "inferior colored". I didn't know colors could be superior to other colors... No, in fact Gibson uses the same Grade A Honduran Mahogany and Grade A Indian Rosewood on everything from the cheapest Junior to the most expensive USA models.

    What is the benefit of having a veneer? It's just something to set the inlays into. And on USA models, it's not even wood, it's resin-impregnated fiberboard.

    Needless to say, desirability is subjective. If you play modern style music, the '61 pickups would not be more desirable for you than the 490/498 set. Also, since when are P-90s less desirable than humbuckers?

    Also untrue. But even if it were, good thing these are electric guitars, so their acoustic resonance is irrelevant because that is not how they produce their sound...
     
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  17. Neezduts89

    Neezduts89 Member

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    I agree with this 100%. I have both the tribute and a standard, and the standard blows it out of the water in every possible way. The tribute is still a wonderful guitar though. I also bought mine as a beat the crap out of everyday guitar
     
  18. Bad Penguin

    Bad Penguin Well-Known Member

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    Listen, everyone here has opinions, and some are valid, others are bias. Pick up an SG, and see if it fits your hand, and plays the sound you want to hear. Whether it's a Faded, Tribute, whatever, just find the one that's for you.
     
  19. Wild Bill212

    Wild Bill212 Active Member

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    OH NO ITS NOT, GIBSON Uses different density woods in cheap to expensive, denser being least desirable. IDC to much what other people think, but telling me I am spreading false info is not cool, nor is it the case. Less dense woods sustain better than denser woods...and it is a fact !
    What you like about pickups is subjective, a matter of personal opine. For me, P-90's are nowehere near as good as Burst-Bucker Pro's, but so what? If you like P-90's better, good for you.
    Gibson used to tell people what grade woods they were putting in their , IDGAS if you believe me, but get it straight from the manufacturer on one of their legacy archive pages.
    What I stated above is true..
     
  20. Wild Bill212

    Wild Bill212 Active Member

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    Thanks, Bro, I have people baggin on me, for stating the obvious, as if its not true...and sometimes if a worker grabs a piece of wood from the wrong pile or woods get mixed up somehow, a player can end up with a much better guitar than they should have.....

    AND you are also correct about your SG Tribute being a great wonderful guitar....all GIBSON Guitars, when set-up properly should 'RING', and they all have a sweet spot where the guitar sounds the best it can, all of them......I have found that it occurs at .004" @ 7TH Fret for Neck Relief on all Slim-Taper necks (+/- .001") and slightly wider NR on Rounded profile and beefier necks, say around .006" @ 8TH Fret....a matter of .002" +/- .001" BUT it makes a HUGE difference. Of course, NUT Slots/Depth, Saddles, Pickup height, String action play their parts too, but Neck Relief is critical in getting a GIBSON to play its best, it can literally be the difference between a Neck feeling 'DEAD' and feeling as if its a 'LIVE WIRE'.......IMO, there are very few bad GIBSON Solid Body Electric Guitars BUT there are plenty of bad set-up's...

    The 2015 SG Special I bought recently, sounded dead when I 1st tried the guitar...When I checked the Neck relief, ICFBI, but it was set at over .025".The guitar sounded DEAD, and the strings felt mushy. I closed the relief to .005" @ 7th fret, adjusted the string action and pick-up height (all after I paid $650 for the guitar) and ten minutes later when I was done, the former owner could not believe how the guitar played or sounded.....too bad for him that he did not know how to make simple adjustments to what is a damn good sounding guitar. Its kinda reminds me of tuning up the old GM V-8 Engines with Carbeurators, a few slight turns of the primary intake screws, and setting the timing correctly, makes a world of difference. All this is real simple but some people dont know how.
     
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