Vibrola spring help!

Walrusgumboot

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I'm sure a lot of people that's bought a new Vibrola has dealt with this issue... Bought a nice aged nickel one for my '64 from crazyparts, and there is way too much curve to the spring, the arm is sticking up at a 45-degree angle and you're completely unable to turn it downward when not using it. Any suggestions on flattening this thing out a bit? Thanks – James
 

Bob L

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Did you order the vintage version that was made for typical neck set angles seen on 1964 guitars? Is your guitar a reissue or a vintage 64?

I installed the Crazyparts vibrola on my vintage 64. The comb angle is such that the high E string just barely touches the end of the comb. At first, I thought about bending the spring but have left it alone. The arm angle is nowhere near 45 degrees.

There are so many variables that come into play - neck angle, string tension, the position of the vibrola frame, etc. I would be very careful if you decide to bend the spring.
 

Walrusgumboot

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Did you order the vintage version that was made for typical neck set angles seen on 1964 guitars? Is your guitar a reissue or a vintage 64?

I installed the Crazyparts vibrola on my vintage 64. The comb angle is such that the high E string just barely touches the end of the comb. At first, I thought about bending the spring but have left it alone. The arm angle is nowhere near 45 degrees.

There are so many variables that come into play - neck angle, string tension, the position of the vibrola frame, etc. I would be very careful if you decide to bend the spring.
Hey Bob. The guitar is a vintage 64 Junior, and I did order the Vintage short Vibrola from crazyparts. I had a 64 and a 68 standard 40 years ago, pardon me as I weep, both with Vibrolas and the angle on those was nothing like this. When I put it in the case or if I wasn't using it while playing I could spin it all the way around pointing at the bottom of the guitar. If I try that with this one it hits the bridge coming down on one side, and hits the side of the guitar coming down on the other side. And forget about closing the case on it!
 

Bob L

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Agreed, photos would help.

I found it surprising that Gibson didn't sell the vibrola as an aftermarket part when I wanted to restore my SG. I have come to the conclusion that Crazyparts is Gibson's sole supplier, and Gibson doesn't sell the part because of all the issues described here and in other posts.
 

Walrusgumboot

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Bob L

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Yes, the angle of the spring and comb changes when you string up the guitar. It will change slightly with different gauge strings.
 

gypsyseven

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Yes, the angle of the spring and comb changes when you string up the guitar. It will change slightly with different gauge strings.
Went from 10‘s to 11‘s on my SG and the Vibrola arm instantly went down quite a bit…very noticeable in a good way. Love it now even more.
 

Gibbo SG

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How about this, and they'll run me out of here for saying this, but just flip the tremolo bar upside down and boom, problem solved. You could even turn the grip handle around once you do that, or before.
 

Von Trapp

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That is correct, I'm afraid you'll be run out. Consider that the OP forgot to put the strings on before making his assessment, severely miscalculating the effect they would have on the trem. Another thing worth taking into account is that it's designed like that on purpose for several reasons, one of which being that the arm will point towards the body when swung around 180 and thus making it possible to comfortably put the guitar in its hardcase. A common problem for junk trem aficionados is that the lid won't close because the trems comb leans forward which consequently the arm will do as well when swung around. Luckily OP solved the problem by simply stringing the guitar.
 


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