W,hich modern SGs become desirable as time goes on?

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by Santiago97, Nov 7, 2020.

  1. skelt101

    skelt101 Active Member

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    Sounds like you might have to track down a Custom Shop Pete Townshend Special. It’d probably go for a pretty price though...
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2020
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  2. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    That was my next one I was going to post about after I posted the Iommi
     
  3. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    IMHO the ones that become more valuable are the ones that didn't sell well.
    The fact that they didn't sell well means Gibson stopped making them, so their
    numbers are small, they become hard to find, and then legendary, and then
    expensive.

    Fishing lures are like that too... the ones that become most collectible
    are the ones that didn't catch fish... so fishermen wouldn't buy them.
    So not many were made... so they're scarce, and so $$$$$$$$... *laughs

    The Zoot suit SG shown above is one of those, Gibson probably spent
    several years in the design and development work on these,
    and then had the bad luck to offer them for sale in 2009,
    when the country was still reeling from the Bush ll fiasco in 2007-8.
    The recovery was just getting started, and nobody was willing to throw
    hard earned cash at a clown-like guitar.
    The response on this site was scathing. I liked the Black and White version,
    but had no spare cash to venture. They made a Zoot Suit Les Paul too...
    try and find one...

    The same thing happened to the SG Raw Power, which I thought was much
    more interesting than the Zooter.
    SG Raw Power Nat.jpg
    The SG RAW POWER was made entirely of maple...
    a totally unique variation on the SG design. Maple neck,
    maple fretboard,'57 classic pickups, this one wows me, in this color (natural).
    To me it looks like an exciting variation, but once again,
    this came out in 2009 and very few guys bought them.
    I'm going to guess these will increase in value, simply because there aren't
    many of them and they are so unique.

    Then there are the 2012 Gibson guitars made with the baked maple fretboard.
    Gibson was forced to make these because federal agents
    entered their factory in 2011 and confiscated a LOT of ebony and rosewood, accusing Gibson of
    shady dealings on the black market in third world countries
    with dodgy political situations.
    Gibson had a lot of legalistic scrambling to do before they paid their fines
    and got their wood back, and during that time
    they had to use baked maple as a substitute.
    April 17 top@100.jpg
    The above silver burst was called a 2012 SG special '70s tribute
    (the first of the series of 'tribute" SGs)
    I wanted one as soon as I saw it... mini hum buckers, small block inlays,
    baked maple fretboard, maple neck with volute,
    another totally unique variation on the SG design.

    The response from players on this forum was scathing as well, lots of WTF GIBSON! kind of posts.
    This was just too much innovation for regular guitar players to accept. Except me, I was all for it.
    How dare Gibson make guitars with some non traditional material for a fretboard!
    I never hang out at MLP, but I'll bet the response was similar if not more severe.
    So the 2012s didn't sell well either, and Gibson marked them down and down, and I finally bought one.
    I love mine. The baked maple has given excellent service for seven years, the maple neck feels quite
    rigid and stable and so I think I paid a low price for an excellent guitar. Mine's not for sale.

    These were discontinued after one year's production. Gibson re-issued this model in like 2016 with a regular
    rosewood fretboard, and they are selling well. So mine is the unusual year, and might become more valuable.
    But I'm not holding my breath. Try to find a 2012 Les Paul with a baked maple neck for sale... that's how
    you know. Those might be even more rare.

    Another model that was badly received was the 2015 SG and also the Les Paul... Gibson once again sprang a few
    innovations on the guitar buying public without offering them as options. Gibson was like, 'love it or shove it.'
    Unfortunately for them, guitarists objected bitterly to: Robot tuners, the slightly wider "soloist" neck, and the
    printed circuit board in the control cavity. Also Gibson issued the 2015s with a "zero fret nut" made of pot metal.
    I don't think there's anything wrong with these innovations as long as the buyer gets to choose whether he gets
    them or not. The zero fret nut is actually a good idea, Iommi has it on all his guitars. But Gibson had to eat crow
    and offer all their buyers a replacement nut made of titanium, because the soft metal part wore out way early.

    Many dealers also offered to replace the robot tuners with regular Gibson tuners at no charge, they were crying
    for a buyer, they were desperate. Nobody was buying the 2015s and this very likely contributed to the downfall of
    the company in 2018. So it was a serious setback. You want a guitar that will increase in value, get an unmodified
    2015, and frame it.
    Almost all of the 2015s that sold were modded to correct the problems above, so an unmodified
    one ought to be scarce. The 2015 SGs and especially the Les Pauls were breathtakingly lovely in their finishes.

    And all the noise about the wider neck was simply blowing smoke, as neck discussions usually are. The soloist neck
    is perfectly playable as designed. Guitarists can be very closed minded about neck shapes. Except for me and some
    others around here.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2020
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  4. catstudioguitars

    catstudioguitars Member

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    The 2007 SG3 will probably continue to increase in value.


    I think SG Standards in white will always be pretty pricey compared to non white ones.

    2013 SGJ will develop even more of a cult following
     
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  5. Tim Huffine

    Tim Huffine New Member

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    1. I’ve got a Gibson Special Custom with crescent on fretboard and picture of Jesse James (original) on the back of the neck. It it 2000 model with double humbucks , painted flat black. Never used the set up looks like it was for slide and was made in Nashville. S/n C-02260536. I can’t find any more Jesse James versions is it worth much ?
     
  6. Tim Huffine

    Tim Huffine New Member

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  7. cerebral gasket

    cerebral gasket Well-Known Member

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    One crescent at 12th fret?
    Can you post pics of the guitar?
     
  8. VSG

    VSG Member

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    And once in a rare while, the lower priced versions of the SG have value over time. For instance this 2017 Cherry Worn/Faded SG plays like one of the best guitars I have ever owned and I am talking about 50 years of playing here folks. The neck is inviting to play. The sound is solid and rich. Trust me when I say I have owned (consecutively and never simultaneously) some of the most desired guitars going. If I had them all in a very large room right now...I would not have to worry about $ issues at all. SG4.jpg
     
  9. SurfNTurf

    SurfNTurf New Member

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    You might not believe this, but the 1997 Japanese Epiphone Junior with a bolt on neck is sought after. Not the indo ply ones. I have an early 2000s Gibson standard and one of the Jap Epi Juniors. My Gibson stays at home and my Epi is played out. The quality is amazing and the tone fantastic. I’m one of the unlucky owners of a Gibson with neck dive, whereas the Epi doesn’t dive at all. I play the heck out of it and the frets still look like new. The action is astonishing. It never goes out of tune. I’ve swapped the stock tuners for Grovers and recently the lightening bolt bridge for an adjustable wrap around, but only because the original had worn down from over 20 years of play. While they don’t fetch a great deal of money, they hold their price and when they come up on Reverb or EBay they GO, way faster than any other Epis. Probably because they no longer offer a Junior and the Japanese ones were only in production for a year before construction switched to Indonesia. I’ve compared the 2, and the Indo is not a patch on the Japanese. Cheaper hardware, cheaper electronics, softer frets, ply wood body with a nasty veneer top that you can see the edges of. I used to turn my nose up too, until I tried one of the Jap ones. If you can see past the bolt on neck and if you can actually source one (they are hard to find, trust me I want another), snap it up. You won’t be disappointed.
     
  10. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    There's my buddy, Col.

    Don't forget to tell the fella, if he is ever going to actually play the guitar, he ought to physically and personally try out the guitar he " thinks" he wants, and others he may consider. Only from actually playing them before buying, will a player know if it is a well made, good fitting, and reliable musical instrument.
     
  11. NMA

    NMA Well-Known Member

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    Baked maple.

    Anytime something comes along for a very brief time, that something becomes desirable. A mystique will grow around this baked maple (it already has to some extent) and SGs with Baked Maple fretboards will be the most sought after SGs in future years.
     
  12. arcticsg

    arcticsg Well-Known Member

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    Hard to say...

    The 2017 SG Gary Clark Signature in Gloss Yellow has held its original purchase price and more. And if this low run 2017 GC Signature is without the common finish cracks, it can, and does command a premium.

    Who knows what the future will bring, only time will tell.

    [​IMG]

    Also the 2013 SG Original in mint condition has held its original price for the most part. This beautiful SG is basically a ‘61 Reissue w/Maestro which includes the large headstock w/correct crown position, and the ‘57 Classic pickups.

    But now that the newer 2019+ SG Standard 61 w/Maestro are common place, the 2013 SG Original will appeal to a smaller clientele, especially the Aged Cherry version.

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. SG standard

    SG standard Well-Known Member

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    Oh I think we know.... for the gloss yellow Gary Clark Signature SG the future will either bring finish checking or more finish checking (depending on it's current state).

    Paying a premium for one without finish checking is a great way to lose money. ;)
     
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  14. arcticsg

    arcticsg Well-Known Member

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    LOL.. well the one I have is still mint with NO checking as of this moment. Humidity/Temp control is a wonderful thing.

    At least I bought the 2018 GC to beat on. :D
    (although for some reason the 2017 sounds lots better)

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. chilipeppermaniac

    chilipeppermaniac Well-Known Member

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    OK what's going on with these ?

    We posted nice pics of tings like Zoot Suits and other guitars and then they turn into IMG?
     
  16. trypeus

    trypeus New Member

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    I'd think that the sprint run SG's from the G-Force experiment year (2015?) would be sought after - they were loaded with 57 Classic pups (standard) or uncovered 61 Zebras (special).
     
  17. laza616

    laza616 Active Member

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    I think any model SG with the ebony fretboard could make a good investment to the future as the ebony supplies are growing thin.
    I think it will be as valued in the future as brasilian rosewood because one day there will be no ebony left. And of course Korina SGs........
     
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  18. Steve D

    Steve D Well-Known Member

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    That Gibson USA Run of Captain Kirk Douglas SGs from this year sold out fast. It looked cool, had unique electronics and they made too few and charged too little so they sold like hot cakes. If you see one out there that's reasonably priced, especially the green one, that's a very collectible guitar. Used ones already sell for above retail price and they literally just finished the run.
     
  19. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Active Member

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    From the standpoint of a player they are all desirable. From the standpoint of an investor, buy beanie babies. More return on the investment and you don't have to screw a musician out of a good instrument.
     

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