Was There Anything Wrong With Your New SG?

LarryBirdsFace

New Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2020
Messages
4
Reaction score
7
I'll preface this by saying I'm already at a disadvantage by being left handed. I know this, I take it into account when I buy every guitar. I get to play nothing before I buy it, any store within 300 miles of me here in rural Maine only has the cheapest Squier Strat as a left in store.
My 2020 Faded Pelham Special came with the compensated lightning bolt bridge.... for a right handed guitar.
Using the two screws I could get the two E strings intonnated and the B and A strings kiiiiindda close. G and D strings.... absolutely impossible.
I called Gibson and they said there was nothing they could do for me. I asked if they would send me just a plain old wrap tailpiece with no compensation, like on old Jr.'s. Nope. So I asked why a $1,500 guitar made by a company that claims only they are good enough, is functionally unuseable from the factory. Guy literally said "I don't really have an answer for you. I wish there was something I could do"
I love the way the guitar plays and sounds so I just took it into my own hands and bought an adjustable wrap bridge. I didn't buy a cheap one either, because the guitar doesn't suck, I just think it's wild that I had to shell out another $125 to get a USA built Gibson to be in tune past the 4th fret and Gibson's response was "well, that sucks. Sorry"
 
Last edited:

ChubbyFingers

Active Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2020
Messages
272
Reaction score
178
Okay.

Here are two photos comparing the frets on what was, I believe, an $1800 to $1900 when new made in the US Gibson and a $700 MIM Tele.

As I've said before, I wasn't expecting to pay Ford (MIM Fender) prices for Mercedes (USA Gibson - or USA Fender for that matter) finesse, so bear that in mind.

The frets on my 2015 SG Standard don't reach the edges of the bindings and there are no nibs. They do, however, seem to overlap the inside edges of the bindings. I can't feel the edges / ends of the frets at all really. Maybe somebody had a fret job done before I bought it used, I don't know.

The frets on my MIM Tele can be felt, only just really, along the bottom (high E) edge of the neck. Sooner or later if / when they ever really become an irritation I will get my needle files out, mask the neck and fretboard face with blue tape and gently file away until I'm happy. If it doesn't become an issue, I won't.


Chubbys SG Nib-less Frets 2 1024.jpg

Chubbys MIM Tele Frets 1024.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: NMA

ChubbyFingers

Active Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2020
Messages
272
Reaction score
178
I'll preface this by saying I'm already at a disadvantage by being left handed. I know this, I take it into account when I buy every guitar. I get to play nothing before I buy it, any store within 300 miles of me here in rural Maine only has the cheapest Squier Strat as a left in store.
My 2020 Faded Pelham Special came with the compensated lightning bolt bridge.... for a right handed guitar.
Using the two screws I could get the two E strings intonnated and the B and A strings kiiiiindda close. G and D strings.... absolutely impossible.
I called Gibson and they said there was nothing they could do for me. I asked if they would send me just a plain old wrap tailpiece with no compensation, like on old Jr.'s. Nope. So I asked why a $1,500 guitar made by a company that claims only they are good enough, is functionally unuseable from the factory. Guy literally said "I don't really have an answer for you. I wish there was something I could do"
I love the way the guitar plays and sounds so I just took it into my own hands and bought an adjustable wrap bridge. I didn't buy a cheap one either, because the guitar doesn't suck, I just think it's wild that I had to shell out another $125 to get a USA built Gibson to be in tune past the 4th fret and Gibson's response was "well, that sucks. Sorry"

And they wonder why they're in bankruptcy.
 

NMA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
979
Reaction score
970
Unfortunately, this is another of those contentious subjects that just causes loads of pointless arguments on this forum - perhaps why the topic came up again?

On the contrary.

I raised this topic noting that my Gibson SG really was flawless. The one thing I noted about mine was a bit of the finish on the upper right horn had not fully cured. If that's as bad as it gets, then Gibson is doing a fine job.

Look, I am not a Gibson guy. I love Rickenbackers and Fenders. It took me 25 years of playing guitar to finally get myself a Gibson. Among the reasons why I shied away from Gibsons was their reputation (online) for shoddy quality control. I fell for it. However, when I did bite and buy a Gibson, I discovered the guitar was damn near perfect. A work of art.
 

Von Trapp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2016
Messages
1,380
Reaction score
880
Location
Sweden
I'll preface this by saying I'm already at a disadvantage by being left handed. I know this, I take it into account when I buy every guitar. I get to play nothing before I buy it, any store within 300 miles of me here in rural Maine only has the cheapest Squier Strat as a left in store.
My 2020 Faded Pelham Special came with the compensated lightning bolt bridge.... for a right handed guitar.
Using the two screws I could get the two E strings intonnated and the B and A strings kiiiiindda close. G and D strings.... absolutely impossible.
I called Gibson and they said there was nothing they could do for me. I asked if they would send me just a plain old wrap tailpiece with no compensation, like on old Jr.'s. Nope. So I asked why a $1,500 guitar made by a company that claims only they are good enough, is functionally unusable from the factory. Guy literally said "I don't really have an answer for you. I wish there was something I could do"
I love the way the guitar plays and sounds so I just took it into my own hands and bought an adjustable wrap bridge. I didn't buy a cheap one either, because the guitar doesn't suck, I just think it's wild that I had to shell out another $125 to get a USA built Gibson to be in tune past the 4th fret and Gibson's response was "well, that sucks. Sorry"

A) That's one of the most stupid things I've ever heard. B) How can people like that be so completely unaware that the internet exists?! When I worked in retail we learned that if you make a customer happy he'll tell about 4 of his friends, if you make him unhappy he'll tell 21. Imagine how much that has increased exponentially with the arrival of the Internets. D) My dad always says "If you want something done, always go for the CEO no matter how trivial." I thought that was a bit over the top at first but since I tried it I never looked back. I've had CEO's of major corporations get sh!t done faster than it takes to read this post. Try it.
 

SG standard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2014
Messages
1,746
Reaction score
2,314
The frets on my 2015 SG Standard don't reach the edges of the bindings and there are no nibs. They do, however, seem to overlap the inside edges of the bindings. I can't feel the edges / ends of the frets at all really. Maybe somebody had a fret job done before I bought it used, I don't know.

Gibson dropped nibs in 2014 and did fret-over-binding. 2015 was the same, so your Standard never had nibs. Traditionalists kept complaining, so in 2016 they brought nibs back, apart from the 'high performance' models, which kept the fret-over-binding, in keeping with their name, and also had fractionally wider necks (slightly less so then your 2015 will have).
 

ChubbyFingers

Active Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2020
Messages
272
Reaction score
178
^ That would explain it then.

Honestly, why they don't stick to one specification and be done with, heaven only knows.
 

cerebral gasket

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2017
Messages
4,199
Reaction score
5,126
The pink binding I posted was on a 2019 LP Special. I have seen the same binding as far back as the mid 2000's. Funny thing is that my 2004 and 2006 SG Classics did not have that problem, but all the SG Standards from that same era did. 2017-2018 they reverted back to white binding, but went back to the pink in 2019.
 

SG standard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2014
Messages
1,746
Reaction score
2,314
Among the reasons why I shied away from Gibsons was their reputation (online) for shoddy quality control. I fell for it. However, when I did bite and buy a Gibson, I discovered the guitar was damn near perfect. A work of art.

Good for you. :thumb: I picked up a perfect SG Standard HP in 2016. In fact, I literally picked up two to compare and I couldn't find a flaw to help me choose between them.

But don't confuse quality and quality control - they are not the same thing at all. Our purchases say nothing about QC:

Imagine G & P make guitars of equal quality, in equal volumes, and with equal numbers of flawed instruments that either company wouldn't want to ship: 1,000 guitars a day, 100 of which are flawed.

P have perfect QC measures, all flawed guitars are returned to the factory for remedial work, so all guitars are equal in quality when they leave the factory.

G's QC is poor, 1 in 4 flaws aren't spotted, so every day 25 flawed guitars leave the factory, along with 975 perfect ones.

What's the result? If you're buying a G, you're most likely going to get a perfect guitar - but you could get one that G would consider sub standard, had their QC spotted it. If you buy a P, it's going to be perfect. So on a guitar forum, you'll not hear people complaining about P's QC (it's good), but you will hear people complain about G's QC (it's poor), even though most of their guitars are perfect. I don't know why people struggle with this concept: 'I bought a perfect Gibson, therefore their QC is great'. Nope, doesn't necessarily follow.

Quality and Quality Control are not the same thing. Buying one perfect guitar (or even a dozen) speaks of quality, but says nothing of quality control.

[Just to be clear, in the above example G doesn't necessarily mean Gibson, and P certainly doesn't mean PRS. Why would dentists need perfect guitars anyway?] :)
 

ChubbyFingers

Active Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2020
Messages
272
Reaction score
178
I don't think most guitar manufacturers can even spell QA!

Now I know we are talking wood and glue and paint here, not jet engines, but...
 

Logan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2016
Messages
1,150
Reaction score
1,302
Location
The St. Louis area on the Illinois side.
For me, my newest SG has a HUGE issue...
full

Gorgeous right? But here’s the issue...
full

It’s got the wrong headstock for a 1963! I mean look at that. I may as well send it back to the factory for a warranty repair.
All jokes aside, it’s a phenomenal guitar, and the reneck made me be able to afford it and not feel terrible about playing it out.

Although, my first SG was one of the recent model years that was left behind; a 2015 Standard. My first Gibson at the age of 14, I played it hard, and I wore through the original brass nut in a few months, replacing it with a titanium from Gibson, and I ended up wearing through 2 of those. In the end, I have a tusk nut fitted to it, and it stays in tune and plays great. Also, the robot tuners were completely unreliable, especially after playing a few-too many humidity stricken gigs outside, it couldn’t read pitch very well anymore. So those major flaws on my first Gibson got sorted out, and replaced under warranty or by what I saw fit.
 

Von Trapp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2016
Messages
1,380
Reaction score
880
Location
Sweden
(now that I think of it, it actually DOES look as if it's upside down, could just be the picture..)
 

Spuds

New Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2019
Messages
21
Reaction score
16
I got a '18 standard about a year ago new. The tenon cover (I think it's called?), the little piece of plastic between the neck pickup and the neck, was just ill-fitting. Like it was just too big for the space so bubbled up slightly. The vast majority of people wouldn't even notice but it bugged me. So I sanded it a little, then a little more, then a little more. Then it was too small! So I bought another one off ebay. Paid $40 for it, most expensive square inch of plastic on the planet. Fits perfect and I'd all but forgotten about it.
 

Dale

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2015
Messages
471
Reaction score
440
Location
Indiana
It has been a while but my 3 SGs wre new. I had intonation, and nut work needed but that was it.
 

Von Trapp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2016
Messages
1,380
Reaction score
880
Location
Sweden
It’s flipped towards the back so the case doesn’t make the guitar go out of tune :ohno:

And wisely so, but it looks as if it's going out and down instead of out and up but it's probably just the angle the pic is taken from that makes it look that way.

kv402mhwemvjy3hj1nbi.jpg
 

SG standard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2014
Messages
1,746
Reaction score
2,314
And wisely so, but it looks as if it's going out and down instead of out and up but it's probably just the angle the pic is taken from that makes it look that way.

Typically they will point down a bit when rotated, as they're not mounted onto a flat surface. Mine has a bar that sticks up higher than the arm on a Bigsby, but if rotated clockwise it will just fowl the switch tip - so there's a big difference in height between playing position and stowed. Mine came in the case rotated counterclockwise, coming to rest as shown in the video here:

 

Von Trapp

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2016
Messages
1,380
Reaction score
880
Location
Sweden
View attachment 41460 [/QUOTE]
Typically they will point down a bit when rotated, as they're not mounted onto a flat surface. Mine has a bar that sticks up higher than the arm on a Bigsby, but if rotated clockwise it will just fowl the switch tip - so there's a big difference in height between playing position and stowed. Mine came in the case rotated counterclockwise, coming to rest as shown in the video here:


Yes, I know (I have a couple) but what I meant was that the arm looks upside down in that pic.
 

Jack Hammer

Member
Joined
May 2, 2017
Messages
49
Reaction score
42
Location
Tennessee
The bridge posts on my SG Standard were off center causing the strings to be shifted toward the treble side. Other than that, it was perfect. Instead of taking a chance on another one, I just ordered some unnotched saddles and notched them about 1/16 toward the bass side. Ordering a Gibson online nowadays is a crap shoot. Took me three attempts to find the perfect Les Paul. The first one looked like they had subcontracted the fret filing out to a middle school shop class. The second one had a backbow even without any tension on the truss rod. I don't know how these things are passing QC.
 


Latest posts

Top