Weight: What do they weigh and does it matter?

Discussion in 'Tone Zone' started by Biddlin, May 10, 2020.

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Do heavier electric guitars sound better than lighterones?

  1. Yes, always

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  2. Yes, usually

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  3. No, never

    2 vote(s)
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  4. Rarely

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  5. Sometimes

    8 vote(s)
    44.4%
  6. Is Biddlin just trolling us?

    8 vote(s)
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  1. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    http://www.everythingsg.com/threads/my-sg-8-lbs-weighs-more-than-my-strat.36884/#post-538160
    In another thread I showed all my SGs, my Strat, Les Paul Custom and their weight(s).
    Here are some more of mine and their weight(s).
    DSCN1282.JPG
    N225-8 lb. 4 oz.
    DSCN1451.JPG
    Epi LP Standard-7 lb. 13 oz.
    1Riv.1.jpg
    Epi Riviera P93-9 lb.
    1lildot.jpg
    Dot Deluxe-8 lb. 2 1/2 oz.
    1wkt.jpg
    Wildkat-8 lb.
    lil red.jpg
    LPJ-8 lb. 12 oz.
    tbd.jpg
    T-bird-9 lb. 7 oz.
    DSCN1151.JPG
    LP Melody Makers left-7 lb. 6 oz. right-7 lb. 11 1/2 oz.
    Now I play all of these, but lately the Goldtop and the Riviera get a lot of play as I rebuild some strength and dexterity. The T-bird bass is the only bass guitar I've ever liked enough to play for fun and keep in my remuda.
    Here's the thing: I know a lot of metal and rockabilly guys say that "Heavier always sounds better" but I can't say that I like one any better than the others. I cannot convince myself that the LPJ sounds better or worse than the Epi Standard. I don't think the LP Custom is louder, or brighter or more resonant than the waspish SG faded cherry Special.
    What do you think? Does more weight equal bigger or better sound?
     
  2. Logan

    Logan Well-Known Member

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    For me, I like my guitars to have good acoustic resonance, because if it sounds good unplugged, it will sound great plugged in (from my experience). And, typically, from my experience, lighter guitars resonate better, because weight (sometimes, not always) translates to moisture content which inhibits vibrations. But, I will say, people have used heavy guitars to great effects and I have serious G.A.S. for a Les Paul Recording, and those are probably the heaviest solid bodies out there.
     
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  3. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    I don't think there's a "better".

    I've played spikey sounding bright heavy guitars and sorta dead ones. Same with the light ones.

    Personally, I would always rather own the lighter guitar. Kind of like I would always pick the guitar with the wider nut...or the more comfortable neck.

    I've only kept one crazy heavy guitar. I've owned quite a few...but the only one that's stuck around is a '73 hagstrom swede.
     
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  4. Biddlin

    Biddlin Well-Known Member

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    You know, knock on Richlite, I've had a single dead sounding guitar in 50+ years, (1972ish solid body) and I gave up on it after a year. Currently all mine are very acoustically resonant so I'll accept those theories.
    I think mine are all keepers, but I have to be aware of when to relieve my back with a lighter one. I used to play one of the LPs for a couple of songs and then switch to an SG or a Strat. The T-bird bass is heavy enough that I feel pretty stiff after a 45 minute set. The other heavy weights are the LP Custom and the Riviera. They are so well balanced that they don't feel that much heavier. The relatively light Wildkat and N225 seem heavier perhaps because they are tail heavy. My 6 pound 10 ounce SG Specials soud great and I can wear them for an hour at a time without loss of sensation in my feet.
     
  5. Didds

    Didds Well-Known Member

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    I find it to be the opposite. Light guitars seem to always be the best ones in my experience, whereas heavy guitars typically seem very dull and dead to me
     
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  6. RW59

    RW59 Member

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    In that other thread where I said that when I first picked up my new 8+lb SG I was worried it might not sound like a proper SG, I was exaggerating. It was really just the cognitive dissonance of assuming it would be light as a feather and discovering that it wasn't.

    There are so many factors influencing guitar tone that when you single out one factor things get hazy.

    I've had Strats weighing a little under 7 lbs to a little over 12 pounds. A 13 lb and an 8.5 lb Les Paul. Explorers from 7 lbs to 12 lbs.

    My anecdotal perception is that there's a broad middle range where weight has little to no correlation to tone.

    But at the extremes, super heavy sounds pure and dry, kind of sterile and precise. Exceptional note definition in chords. Maybe ideal for people who use lots of effects.

    Super light, the fundamental gets overshadowed by the harmonics and resonances and it can sound thin and wimpy, with blurry chords.
     
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  7. Bbr6704

    Bbr6704 New Member

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    Well, to sum it upquickly, I have, had, play and played :
    Heavy guitars that sounded very well,
    Heavy guitars that sounded dull,
    Light guitars that sounded very well,
    Light guitars that sounded dull...

    Like Norton, I am very careful to how a guitar sounds unplugged. If it sounds good, it will be good plugged. The same the other way : If it sounds bad unplugged, it won't be good sounding plugged.

    About weight, the important thing is : is the guitar confortable, playable.

    About the guitar, it's the quality of the craftmanship, of the woods, of many other things (neck, nut, bridge), that also contribute to the global tone.

    I couldn't say witch of my 11lb or so Heritage H150 or my 7 lb or so SG sounds better, they both play and sound killer, in a slightly différent way...
     
  8. Allen Epling

    Allen Epling New Member

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    I have several SGs, all full mahogany, and I am constantly impressed with how it resonates throughout the whole body when struck, unplugged. I also have several solid body Fenders but they do not resonate like the SGs do. I don't think the thickness or weight have as much to do with tone as the kind of wood used, and perhaps construction. perhaps the neck joint has something to do with it too.
     
  9. Clifdawg

    Clifdawg Well-Known Member

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    My SG is slimmer than a Victoria’s Secret model, but its tone is, as the kids say, THICC. I don’t think weight has much of anything to do with tone. I do like heavy guitars though, there’s a physical (not audible) feeling of substance to them that I like. My new Tele is a hoss with that solid Alder body.
     
  10. Von Trapp

    Von Trapp Well-Known Member

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    Moot question. That's not how an electric guitar works.
     
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  11. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Well-Known Member

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    I mostly play bass, and I only have two of those that are on the hefty side, never bothered to weigh them.

    I doubt my favorite treble guitards are much over 7lbs including my les paul.
     
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