Well - what did I do!? Tell me about this early 70s SG

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I bought this from GC tonight. Fortunately, GC has a great return policy, so if its garbage and I way overpaid, then I can at least get my money back!

Serial Number: 900013

The serial number ironically spoke to me because my birthday is 9/13. So it was kind of neat. I know quite a bit is not original to this guitar, as this was the description....

Item includes non-original Epihone hardshell case. Item has replaced tuners, bridge, Dimarzio Super Distortion neck pick-up, Gibson Burst-Bucker I bridge pick-up, original factory Bigsby trem. Made In: United States. This product comes with a case.

From the photos - which aren't great, I would love to get your opinion on this guitar. It was $1800 and I definitely don't want to overpay for a vintage guitar that is certainly not original. Additionally, they labeled this as a '1973' - but the serial number seems to be a 1970-1972 - so I was curious on your thoughts here as well!

I guess I am asking if $1800 is too much for this example. I'd likely end up selling my 2004 61' Reissue if I kept it - all because of a serial number lol. Additionally - it almost seems like a very faded cherry instead of a walnut, but I guess I'll know for sure once I take the plate off.

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everdying

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yes, looks '73 to me.
as for the price... hmm... i would think $1300 is fair... unless prices have really gone up recently.

btw, 1 quirk of a' 73 is the flat neck / body angle.
 

MR D

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I bought this from GC tonight. Fortunately, GC has a great return policy, so if its garbage and I way overpaid, then I can at least get my money back!

Serial Number: 900013

The serial number ironically spoke to me because my birthday is 9/13. So it was kind of neat. I know quite a bit is not original to this guitar, as this was the description....

Item includes non-original Epihone hardshell case. Item has replaced tuners, bridge, Dimarzio Super Distortion neck pick-up, Gibson Burst-Bucker I bridge pick-up, original factory Bigsby trem. Made In: United States. This product comes with a case.

From the photos - which aren't great, I would love to get your opinion on this guitar. It was $1800 and I definitely don't want to overpay for a vintage guitar that is certainly not original. Additionally, they labeled this as a '1973' - but the serial number seems to be a 1970-1972 - so I was curious on your thoughts here as well!

I guess I am asking if $1800 is too much for this example. I'd likely end up selling my 2004 61' Reissue if I kept it - all because of a serial number lol. Additionally - it almost seems like a very faded cherry instead of a walnut, but I guess I'll know for sure once I take the plate off.

B04B68u.png


qJMP74Lh.png


R7UTuDLh.png


3bLXZBUh.png


pz0HN7Jh.png


kIPp203h.png

Looks to be in pretty good shape for a 50 year old Guitar, u kno? Too bad that its not very original parts wise. $1800 is not too much if it functions as it should AND it is a Guitar you really want ! The price is pretty much what a new SG 'Modern' Standard will set you back after buying the additional HSCase. I'd like to get a new one next to it and have a SHOOTOUT to see which sounds better.
 

jtees4

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Cool SG, that's my only opinion.
 

Decadent Dan

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I had one with a repaired break at the body near the neck joint. The wood in front broke at both corners of the neck pickup ring. It looked rough but played good.
 

smitty_p

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Those old SGs are great. I have a ‘74 Special and it’s very enjoyable to play.
 

Col Mustard

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Welcome to ETSG!
That one looks legitimate to me... It's the kind of guitar you pounce on,
because you'll never see another one like it. Guitars of that time period
were ruthlessly butchered, mod fever was sweeping the country just like
now. People thought DiMarzio pickups were cool. *shrugs

Take it to the best luthier you can find/afford and get it set up properly.
If it's got the flat neck angle, that takes a bit to get used to.
But a guitar like this is an honor to own. The necks are narrow... more
so than later or earlier Gibbies. That also takes some getting used to.

But it's a piece of history, and it has your birthday for a serial number.

Don't sell your '61... sell something else.
Keep both...
 

Col Mustard

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I'll repeat, at the risk of repeating myself:
DON'T SELL YOUR '04 61 ReIssue! Those are among the best guitars Gibson
ever made. That '61 is a guitar of a lifetime. It's a treasure and also an
honor to own.

The '73 was held (for a time) to be among the worst guitars Gibson ever made...
...beat for this dubious honor by the '71s and '72s
>These opinions held by fickle public opinion and closed minded guitarists!
Guitarists didn't like the changes that Gibson made to the SG design after being
taken over by the "Norlin Corporation." Norlin SGs changed the body shape, and
the neck shape, they changed the neck angle from Gibson's traditional 4 degrees
to zero. It took years of pressure from buyers to get Gibson to put things right
finally.
But that doesn't keep your guitar from being a very cool old war horse, and it can be set up
and made playable, and it can sound and play as well as any.

For many of us, a '70s Gibbie is the closest we will ever come to even seeing
let alone being able to own and play a vintage guitar. The Norlin SGs have been
rehabilitated a lot among guitarists lately, hence the price tag. But if it were ten
years older, the price would go way up. And a Gibson that was twenty years older
would be outa sight.

Anyway, what you bought is a fine old Gibson that's been modded but looks still
playable. So it should be set up by the best luthier you can find/afford, and then
you should rock that sucker. With DiMarzio "distortion" and Burstbucker 1, it will
be very different in tone to your "61. So it's very good to keep both.
 

Go Nigel Go

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I can't fault the description above. The Norlin years catch a lot of flack, unfairly in my opinion, but it is a fact that Gibson messed with the formula a lot during those years, and a lot of people got mightily offended as with the "New Coke vs Coke Classic" wars that came a decade later. For my money that guitar is awesome and I would totally embrace it for what it is, modifications and all. I would probably also love the '61 (re-issue or original for that matter). It is all about what the axe offers you as a player that you can't get from another instrument. That Norlin era guitar has a lot to offer the open minded player that you won't get from even another Gibson SG from an earlier or later period.
 
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I'll repeat, at the risk of repeating myself:
DON'T SELL YOUR '04 61 ReIssue! Those are among the best guitars Gibson
ever made. That '61 is a guitar of a lifetime. It's a treasure and also an
honor to own.

The '73 was held (for a time) to be among the worst guitars Gibson ever made...
...beat for this dubious honor by the '71s and '72s
>These opinions held by fickle public opinion and closed minded guitarists!
Guitarists didn't like the changes that Gibson made to the SG design after being
taken over by the "Norlin Corporation." Norlin SGs changed the body shape, and
the neck shape, they changed the neck angle from Gibson's traditional 4 degrees
to zero. It took years of pressure from buyers to get Gibson to put things right
finally.
But that doesn't keep your guitar from being a very cool old war horse, and it can be set up
and made playable, and it can sound and play as well as any.

For many of us, a '70s Gibbie is the closest we will ever come to even seeing
let alone being able to own and play a vintage guitar. The Norlin SGs have been
rehabilitated a lot among guitarists lately, hence the price tag. But if it were ten
years older, the price would go way up. And a Gibson that was twenty years older
would be outa sight.

Anyway, what you bought is a fine old Gibson that's been modded but looks still
playable. So it should be set up by the best luthier you can find/afford, and then
you should rock that sucker. With DiMarzio "distortion" and Burstbucker 1, it will
be very different in tone to your "61. So it's very good to keep both.

I just unboxed it - and dang - its nice. Can you all talk about this "flat neck angle" more - I don't quite understand that as it looks the same as my 61 RI.
 

Go Nigel Go

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The neck angle refers to the fret board being parallel with the top of the body (zero degree angle) as opposed to the nominal 4 degree back angle that most other Gibsons tend to have. I find it just as comfortable either way (having both myself), but it is a little different. I can't tell for sure in the photos, but yours does look to be one of the Zero Degree models. They went back to using a back angled neck shortly after yours was made, I just don't know what year. I am pretty sure they started the Zero Degree necks in '71, but it was a pretty short run and was one of the first things they changed back. I see yours has some nice bevels. '71 and '72 had very few body bevels which was a major bone of contention for a lot of folks. Again, me personally, I don't care all that much. Bevels are awesome, but my '71 is still a great guitar without them.

Next up I'd love to hear your thoughts after you get to play it for a couple of days. Hope it plays as good as it looks! :cheers:
 

Col Mustard

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he's right IMHO... lots of great music was played on '70s Gibbies,
so the fact that they were different from the sixties construction only makes
them unique and cool, fifty years later.
 

PermissionToLand

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Norlin SGs changed the body shape, and
the neck shape, they changed the neck angle from Gibson's traditional 4 degrees
to zero. It took years of pressure from buyers to get Gibson to put things right
finally.

Not quite; the big changes including the front-mounted controls and LP pickguard happened in late 1971 and were reversed from mid to late 1972. So depending on where you draw the line, it only took a year or less for Gibson to respond to the poor sales of the Deluxe. This 1973 has every change that was made in restoring the features of the Standard for the rest of the 1970s, including the angled neck.

I just unboxed it - and dang - its nice. Can you all talk about this "flat neck angle" more - I don't quite understand that as it looks the same as my 61 RI.

Don't worry, your SG has an angled neck. That feature returned in late 1972, around the same time as the cutaway bevels returned: https://solidguitar.fandom.com/wiki/SG_Standard#1972_Deluxe_.2F_Standard
 

Dave

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Cool SG. Congrats.

The price seems about right. Those 70s SGs keep going up in value.

One really cool thing about those is the pickup placement. The neck PU is right up against then fretboard and the bridge PUi closer to the neck and further away from the bridge than other year SGs.
Gives it a different tone. Compare the PU placment to you 61 reissue and you'll see the differencce.
 


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