What is this model?

Discussion in 'Vintage SG' started by Stella, Jul 29, 2021.

  1. AngelDeVille

    AngelDeVille Well-Known Member

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    Dunno what it is, but if it played well it would have come home with me for a well negotiated price. Hopefully $400ish
     
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  2. skydog6653

    skydog6653 Member

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    If it was local I’d pay $550 for that all day.
     
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  3. Rathius

    Rathius New Member

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    It’s a Gibson Les Paul double cut. $550 is not a bad price. They sell for more on Reverb.
     
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  4. Capthutch

    Capthutch New Member

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    I’m not much of a post respond guy. It looks similar to a Les Paul Standard Double Plus.

    The “Plus” allows for the gold hardware and the Bigsby. Most of these models had a pick guard. Some w P90s some not.

    These were starting to show up in response to the early success of the intial PRS Santana. The initial run of the Santana models was somewhere south of 100 pieces. Very $$ of course, but multiple requests for the Santana model arose and from this the PRS brand grew quickly.

    I play both PRS and Les Paul Specials. I have seen a couple of these oddballs over the last decades.

    For $500 I’d be in on it.
     
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  5. Jackson753

    Jackson753 Member

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    Initially it did remind me of the 80s solid 335 but it's different. 1980-gibson-335-solidbody-ad.jpg
     
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  6. Jackson753

    Jackson753 Member

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  7. Pointyfan

    Pointyfan Member

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    That was Mark Farner's Messenger guitar, Nigel.. He played that and a Microfrets during most of his career..
     
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  8. ruster1

    ruster1 Active Member

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    It is definitely NOT a LP standard double cut.. as it has an SG neck pocket.. LP DC would have flat slab across the back with a LP neck fitment.. this is definitely an SG neck pocket.. but where are the bevels? in any case.. It is a GIBSON of some type and maybe had T-tops on it?.. if it is a player, $ 500 is more than fair.. find out what it is later.. the FIREBRAND is the closest call i can see..

    It is most likely a ES-335-S for sure.. and worth every penny if in playing shape.. they did make them back to 1980 i believe and had a run in the 2008-2013 ish era?
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
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  9. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, that's the thing... for everything this guitar COULD be, there are half a dozen reasons it isn't. Everything is speaking towards some sort of Luthier salvage or custom project. As I stated before, that is not a deal breaker (at least for me), but the value is going to be 90% based on how it plays. It definitely has at least some Gibson parts, and loads of groovy charm. If it's well done, it's well done and a solid player is worth $500. Maybe more. It all depends.
     
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  10. Jackson753

    Jackson753 Member

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    Sometimes the horns on these look less pronounced. Like in this example. 11.jpg 1.jpg
     
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  11. Mike Brown

    Mike Brown New Member

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  12. Houdi_Elbow

    Houdi_Elbow Member

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  13. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    Without a doubt... the body of this guitar was re-shaped. It's a decent job... but it's still obvious.

    What's not obvious is what happened with the fretboard and headstock overlay.

    It doesn't appear that the neck has been out of it's pocket. But the fretboard could've easily been replaced. The headstock veneer would also be an easy add on.

    The neck pocket does look pretty close to the 335S. It's very possibly a re-shaped 335s. But one with a new fretboard and headstock veneer???
     
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  14. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Well-Known Member

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    Also the switch is out of position for either a LP Doublecut or 335s. No sign that I can see that it was ever moved. There are just so many headscratchers it is hard to pin it down. That neck joint and heel screams SG to me, but that has been pretty much disproven beyond a reasonable doubt. So many contradictions it is hard to keep up with them all. I would love to play it and see if it was something I wanted to live with... It ticks all the boxes I have that can be ticked from descriptions and photographs alone.
     
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  15. Chuteboxehero

    Chuteboxehero Well-Known Member

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    Looks like the Bigsby was also added on after the fact. You can see a decent size hole where the original bridge post once sat near the left side of the Bigsby in that one pic. Didn't notice that before. This one is definitely interesting. That neck and body joint looks like it's never been apart.
     
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  16. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Well-Known Member

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    Good eye! I didn't notice the pocket for the tail piece post until you mentioned it. That would put the tail piece well behind the bridge (looks like around 2 or more inches?). At any rate, well behind where the hard tail stop bar sits on most Gibsons, including those others pictured in this thread. In fact the only two I know of that are that far back are my 1971 SG Deluxe (right at 3 inches from the bridge to the stop bar) and one other SG Deluxe of the same year I saw pictured on this forum (somewhere in the "show us your SG" thread) that looks about the same as mine. Even most '71 SGs look about the same bridge to stop spacing as all the other Gibsons out there.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
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  17. Norton

    Norton Well-Known Member

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    The Overlay pic donpearce posted isn't exactly a 1 to 1 comparison. The bridges aren't lined up.

    Which makes me wonder if the guitar in question could've been one of those Sg's You're talking about GNG. Could One of those Sg's without any carves or bevels fit this shape inside the lines??
     
  18. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Well-Known Member

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    It may not be 1 to 1 exactly, but it is close enough to convince me that whatever minor scale differences exist are probably not the reason it doesn't fit. My first thought when I saw this instrument was early Norline years because of the lack of bevels, but I think the body profile of a 71-72 is not really much different from any other SG. It's mainly the minimal use of body bevels, and the neck set parallel to the top that sets them apart and causes so much consternation. The wide bridge to stop bar spacing is an oddity even amongst the '71 SG deluxes. If this guitar was made by modifying a Gibson body, that would make it the only third I have seen that was not the normal inch or so you would expect for a factory hard tail. If Gibson made a 335s in '71-'72 I would be looking in that direction for the donor body. That doesn't even remotely appear to have ever happened though.
     
  19. DJGranite

    DJGranite Member

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    I think maybe it should start with: What year is it.
    Serial # 889xxx

    • 1953-1961: Unique solidbody electric guitar "inked" serial numbers.
    • 1961-1969: 4,5 or 6 digit peghead stamped serial number for all models, no MADE IN USA stamped below.
    • 1969-1975: 6 digit peghead stamped serial number, MADE IN USA stamped below.
    • 1975-1977: tagged (decal) serial number, MADE IN USA below.
    • 1977-present: 8 digit stamped serial number, MADE IN USA stamped below.
    I don't see "MADE IN
    USA"

    820088 to 823830 1966
    824000 to 824999 1969
    828002 to 847488 1966 or 1969
    847499 to 858999 1966 or 1969
    859001 to 895038 1967
    895039 to 896999 1968
    897000 to 898999 1967 or 1969
    899000 to 899999 1968

    If it does have the MADE IN
    USA ...

      • Gibson Serial Numbers, early to mid 1970's.

      • All models, stamped in back top of headstock. "MADE IN U.S.A." stamped below the serial number in back top of peghead, in the same size type, and on two lines with "U.S.A." below the "MADE IN":
    700000's 1970-1972
    800000's 1973-1975
    900000's 1970-1972

    So the search should probably start one of the 2 eras using 6 numbers in the 8xxxxx's

    1967 no USA

    1973-1975 with USA

    Another pic showing the entire back of headstock would be nice.
    Volute/no volute etc
     
  20. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, based on your serial number/headstock markings information I think the neck is probably 1967-69. I just don't see any bodies from that period that match up. or look like they could be original to the neck even if modified. I'm sticking with a very interesting parts guitar, likely built a long time ago by someone fairly skilled at their craft. Respect.
     

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