What type of headstock breaks are better than others for a permanent fix?

ElChiguete

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So I know that everyone if given the option wouldn stay away from a headstock that is broken (specially on SGs and other guitars with a Gibson type of headstock design) but say that you would get a KILLER deal on a guitar because it's headstock was broken, what would be the type of breaks that you would say "yeha that can be fix and the guitar would work just fine" and which type you would be scared that it would give you problems in the future or that it just wouldn't be a stable headstock again?

Of course that would all depend of the skills of the luthier but I would imagine that there are some headstock breaks that for a normal player or seller we would think it's a big deal but for a luther they would say it's an easy fix could get you a good guitar for cheap.
 

DrBGood

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Almost anything that is not a 90° break. The longer along the neck, the easier to repair solid.
 

Norton

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DrBGood is spot on.

it's such a visual thing... far easier to explain with pictures than words. But really, almost anything can be repaired.
 

rabbit

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I always thought that the more surface area to reconnect the better chances of success,... then I saw this and said to myself I guess anything is possible.

 

Col Mustard

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the best break to try and get repaired is the one where the owner didn't try to
push it back together, but left it alone until a qualified luthier took it in hand.

My luthier repairs a number of broken headstocks each month... it's routine work.
He says DON"T try and push it together... the first time that is done should be the
time it's got glue on it and it's ready to be clamped.

Gibsons break right at the headstock joint because of the nature of the grain of mahogany.
It's weak where the headstock slants back at Gibson's prescribed 17 degrees
Gibsons built with maple necks don't have this problem, neither do Fender guitars made with
maple necks.

Other guitars don't use as steep of a back angle, and maybe they are stronger.
Gibson's back angle is 'traditional" and very few players want to see them change it.
It's one of the ways we get the awesome tones we want from our Gibsons.k
There are Gibson bashers who'll say that the 17 degree back angle is a design flaw,
but they don't know anything.
Lute neck angle.jpg
Good luck with your project.
Our Gibson guitars need to be well taken care of.
Now let's see some more pictures...
 

ElChiguete

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Well no proyect yet, hopefully one in the future. Thanks for the replys.
 
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Look at some youtube videos of "Gibson Headstock Repair". You'll see some interesting stuff done with routing groves, installing splines (for lack of a better word), and doing professional level almost undetectable repairs.

If you're thinking of a home repair, something like @beerbelly posted can be done with clamps and glue. A pro might shudder to see that done (no splines, etc) but it will likely work.
 


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