WHAT UNIT DO YOU OWN OR HAVE TRIED???

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by vic108, Dec 28, 2006.

  1. irockguitar82

    irockguitar82 Member

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    I use ProTools with MBox (1).
     
  2. mr_dj07

    mr_dj07 Member

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  3. spacefuzz

    spacefuzz Member

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    [quote author=vic108 link=topic=11696.msg154835#msg154835 date=1168187044]
    capturing the elusive
    IDEA OF THE MOMENT isn't as easy as it was in the analog days!

    [/quote]

    I'm using Cakewalk Guitar Tracks Pro 3, the M-Audio Fast Track Pro USB interface, Amplitube modeler software, and Acoustica Beatcraft Drum software all on my laptop. Man, I couldn't be happier with how fast I can get things going when an idea or tune pops into my head. I don't necessarily need it to sound live or warm, just to get a skeletal song structure down in a matter of an hour or two is a Godsend to me. Way easier than my old Tascam 488 Portastudio and Dr. Beat machine, and I can do it all in my living room, without having to run down to the studio(garage), and without having to set up a buncha stuff and run back and forth. Plus, if I hate it in the morning, I can polish my turds by cutting and pasting and re-recording parts. I had all but quit playing guitar before I picked up this stuff and figured out how to use it. increased my songwriting productivity tenfold, and I'll never lose one of those "woke up with a tune in my head" moments again. Gotta love technology.
     
  4. ericseanjohnson

    ericseanjohnson Member

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    For as much as you'll pay for a lot of these recorders you might as well invest in a decent computer and get pro tools with an mbox or another program for about three hundred bucks or so. Way easier to use and much better editing, sequencing (drums, keys, strings, etc.) and easier to transport your tracks.
     
  5. vic108

    vic108 Well-Known Member

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    Yah, but some of us old timers love the feel of sliders & knobs and meters!
    Recording with a PC is so 2 dimentional.

    And that's the other thing, I got a "three button hand me down" PC
    that's pretty slow with minimum RAM......running WINDOWS 98 SE.....
     
  6. ericseanjohnson

    ericseanjohnson Member

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    Yeah I guess that'll put a damper on pc recording. But even with pc recording you can have faders and knobs. Anyway that was just my thought on it all.
     
  7. vic108

    vic108 Well-Known Member

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    Well, it sounds like you know what yer doing,
    recording to PC-wise. I wanna hear more, man!

    I got alot to learn!

    Do you like PC or MAC better for recording?
    Any SOFTWARE stands out in your mind?
    Digital clipping - the PC screens are too small to see! What do you do?

    Thanks!
     
  8. ericseanjohnson

    ericseanjohnson Member

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    Well in my case I work most of the time in a professional studio with Pro Tools HD3, Two large screens and the whole nine yards. But at home I have just have Acid 5.0. Which don't waste the money on it. I am saving to get Pro Tools LE with Digi 003 interface. Go to recording for dummies under gear talk. It's a topic Lex Lurid started. I have the basics of recording on a computer there.
    I personally like Mac better but you're gonna sacrifice your first born to afford one. Well unless you're pretty well off, but still pc's are alot cheaper and they work just fine. What really matters are your AD/DA converters, your pre-amps and your mics.
     
  9. antichef

    antichef Member

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    I had never used Macs or done much computer recording (since 1992, when I spent hours with my 8 bit soundblaster card and an old shure microphone), but got a mac about a year ago and noticed the Garage Band program. Soon, I was messing with it.

    I also downloaded Audacity to my windows computer. Audacity was pretty good, but didn't include a MIDI system, so you pretty much had to record your tracks live (I suppose you could record a loop and then paste over and over, but you couldn't use MIDI instruments). I really have to have MIDI for drum loops, so I focused on Garage Band, which I'll call GB for short. Very easy to use, and very good about getting across some core computer recording concepts.

    I also started working with an audio interface quickly thereafter -- I got the Presonus Inspire, which works well with GB - it lets you record two mic'ed tracks at once (or one stereo mic'ed track) and has two other inputs that don't have preamps, and are a little noisy (intended for a turntable, but I haven't tried that yet). In total, I was able to record 4 tracks simultaneously, if I used outboard preamps for the other two inputs. The gain on the built in preamps was a little low for my dynamic microphones (worked great with condensers), and I wanted to try recording more simultaneous tracks, so I got a MOTU traveler - 4 preamps, and a bunch of other inputs.

    Meanwhile, I noticed that GB artificially restricted recordings to a 44.1khz sampling rate (which is CD quality, I think), but the hardware supported higher rates (I think Audacity supports higher rates, but I haven't tried it on the mac, and my pc doesn't have firewire support or XP, which would be needed for both of those audio interfaces). So recently I started working with Logic Express -- I bought an older version and upgraded it through a troublesome and cryptic process, but now it's the latest. It allows higher sampling rates, so now I've been recording at 96khz. I do notice a small difference (but note that when I make MP3's, it all goes back to the lower rate anyway). I find Logic Express much harder to use than GB, but I suppose there's more to it. As I've learned the interface, I'm getting better with it. It actually has a restriction to recording 12 simultaneous tracks that GB doesn't have (but 12 is probably more than I'll need). Logic Pro doesn't have the restriction, and has a lot more software, but it costs quite a bit more.

    The MOTU preamps have enough gain for all my mics, but I heard great things about the ART Digital MPA Gold, so I recently added that. It has two channels, and plugs digitally into the MOTU. Each channel has variable input impedance, which I'm finding makes a big difference with some of my mics. I'm finding that some mics sound better in the MOTU and some in the ART.

    I can recommend any of the equipment I listed -- all good stuff. I also have a ART Tube MP preamp that I don't recommend, and a Presonus Tube Preamp that I barely recommend -- both of those have 12AX7 tubes in them, but run them at low voltages so they don't do much except sound kind of bad -- some people refer to this sort of equipment as "toob". The ART Tube MP is too noisy to use (mine is, anyway) - the Presonus is better. Note that the ART Digital MPA I mentioned above also uses 12AX7's, but it runs them at high voltage, using them as they were designed to be used. In all, my short experience is that having tubes in your microphone preamp doesn't have nearly impact that having tubes in your guitar amp does, even at high voltage.

    Now I've gotten busy at work and don't have time to record much -- rats. I still try to do something small a few times a week, and there'll come a time soon when I can put more time into it again.
     
  10. ericseanjohnson

    ericseanjohnson Member

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    Garage Band is great!! I'm not a huge fan of Logic. It's really not to intuitive but once you learn it, it gets the job done and has great midi and synth tools!
     
  11. vkgphil

    vkgphil Active Member

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    [quote author=Voxman link=topic=11696.msg152594#msg152594 date=1167398390]
    also have Sonar on the puter too
    [/quote]

    hey vox how's that working for you? i am tempted to get the home studio xl version 6
     

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