where to start on guitar playing

Discussion in 'Lessons & Techniques' started by Tazz3, Oct 14, 2014.

  1. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Active Member

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    hello sorry if this has been asked a milion times. where to start.
    so far i been doing finger excerise going up and down the fret borad
    geting to know each string and makeing sure iam hiting each string with the tips of my fingers i do good on the E,B,G, strings when i get to the top 3 sometimes i mute the string below it i know i wont learn this over night.
    i been watching justin and marty on youtube for lessons. and reading tabs also. and i also been working on the D cord lol. last night i particed for a few hours. takeing a beak every 25 mins, also i relax my hand when iam freting and it seems better no pain that way sorry for the long topic
     
  2. dbb

    dbb Well-Known Member

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    Are you holding your thumb behind the neck and arching your fingers over the fingerboard? If you are flattening your wrist or fingers you may be unintentionally muting the lower strings.

    Practice going across all 6 strings in one position and making all the notes clear.

    I don't mean to be a pest, but proper technique helps in these cases.

    I looked at some of their videos, and they play basic rock and blues well enough, but both have a habit of flattening the wrist and letting the thumb go around the neck, when not using the thumb for bass notes. So you are only getting one version of guitar technique from these guys. Also more advanced players (or guys with really big hands) can sometimes get away with this, but it may not be best for a beginner.

    I mean, they play fine, but I've seen way better players.

    I suggest looking at some other videos by some more advanced player/teachers too. Nothing wrong with these guys, just not complete.

    Sorry, I'm a guitar teacher......
     
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  3. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Active Member

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    Hi don't be sorry for beging a teacher, thanks for the tips so I should try to keep my wrist kinda straight sometimes I mute sometimes I don't anyways,i won't be a SRV over night lol.
    Or ever in my life lol if I can think of anything I will ask.
     
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  4. Kerry Brown

    Kerry Brown Well-Known Member

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    Learn the right technique now. If you don't you will regret it later. I played for many years exactly how dbb describes not to do it. Now many years later I'm getting serious about my playing and am regretting that such a bad habit is so ingrained. I find it hard to solo up and down the fretboard because the inside of my palm is dragging on the neck. I have to concentrate very hard to maintain the correct position. It is also hard to use the baby finger when soloing because of this bad habit. Learn the right way now or live with regret later.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2014
  5. dbb

    dbb Well-Known Member

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    Kerry makes my point better than I can.

    OK, teacher honesty, you need to palm the neck and use the thumb as a pivot for string bending, so I shift to that position when bending strings too.

    Plus, I've heard guys play amazing music with all sorts of non-traditional techniques, so please use anything that works.

    Do anything at all, just let it come from a basis of solid technical skills.

    But, the "inside of my palm is dragging on the neck" thing explains why so many players are always asking about getting the back of the neck to be smooth, or not sticky or whatever. I never had that problem since my hand is rarely in contact with the neck, and I'm all over my beginning uke, guitar and mandolin students to keep the hand, thumb and arched fingers in the right position.

    As for using the 4th finger, sure, Django tore it up with 2 functional fingers and a little bit of the atrophied parts for those 69 chords, but most of the great jazz and classical players need all their digits.

    Many great blues and rock players have used the fingers 1 2 3, with very occasional use of 4, and sounded wonderful, like Clapton, who uses his little finger for chords but not so much for soloing.

    Compare that to the way, uh, to shamelessly remind people that this guy still exists, is Yes's Steve Howe and his hand position and use of all fingers.

    In fact I'll post a video:

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bri7gSIp8Q]Yes' Steve Howe Guitar Lesson - YouTube[/ame]

    Plus, he's a goofy guy, good for a laugh.

    more at

    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1902C3197BA3715B
     
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  6. eS.G.

    eS.G. Well-Known Member

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    Ask away always happy to help. practice practice practice is all I can say.
    Run scales and finger positions anytime you can....watching t.v. waiting on the microwave......keep that ax handy and pick it up and play anything just get the muscle memory going ;) It will be like breathing for you eventually you will just do it. :)
     
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  7. dbb

    dbb Well-Known Member

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    Funny you mention that - in the 70's, when I was a kid, I'd sit and run scales on an unplugged electric guitar when I watched TV with the family. they couldn't hear it, and I'd play scales, patterns, whatever, just making sure that I was keeping good technique. I had good teachers then.
     
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  8. eS.G.

    eS.G. Well-Known Member

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    I am fingering the Grey Ghost while I read your post Dave. ;)

    UHM WAIT that sounded pervy ....the Grey Ghost is my LES PAUL, get your minds out of the gutter. Geesh!
     
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  9. Heket

    Heket Well-Known Member

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    I love Marty!

    One of best things you can do with practicing is not just what you practice but how you practice. If you are going to practice "a few hours" every night then that fine (and well done!) but don't practice for hours one night then nothing for the next few days. Little bites over an extended period of time = consistency = a much easier time for your brain to learn.

    Something you'll hear a lot of players and youtube tutors do is throw around chord numbers like we all know Em6add9 offhand. You WILL need to learn chords and the theory behind them or you will get lost if you ever want to improvise or write cool stuff. I can tell you this from my own experience now I'm learning bass, but it applies to guitar too. Even if all you play is power chords, there will still be chord changes in the song which can be used if you ever wanted to solo or add a bass line. Knowing chords gives you the power to unlock which notes sound best, which notes to use as anchors, which notes to use sparingly as "spice".

    This might sound rather theory-ish to you and you'd be right, but I think it's an essential piece of theory to know. So, as well as running up and down scales learn lots of chords and the building blocks that make them (intervals). I'm sure someone more knowledgeable than me can suggest a list of commonly used and useful chords.

    I haven't been playing guitar long, I'm not a teacher, I just want to share my experience and what worked for me so far. I hope it helps :)
     
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  10. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Another important thing. Do not put the guitar away in its case. Leave it out on your favourite chair, so whenever you sit down you pick up the guitar. Practice chords and scales - sure, but mostly listen to small bits of tune or riffs that you like and try to pick them out.

    Yet another important thing, even for a lead guitarist is that playing the guitar is not about notes - it is about chords, or should I say each note lives in a chord. Think about the sound of the chord as you play the note. It really helps give the notes context, and makes playing the tune a bit more fun.

    There will be a lot of important things before you are done.
     
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  11. dbb

    dbb Well-Known Member

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    This is good advice - even to jazz players that now are hung up on this chord-scale thing.

    The way I learned was to know all your arpeggios, too. You need them for bass playing, too.

    Every note is either inside of a particular chord and its arpeggio, or it's a "color" tone of some sort, from mild ones like 6ths and 9ths to more harsh altered 5ths.
     
  12. Bullfrog

    Bullfrog Well-Known Member

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    Yep.

    Learn proper technique first! Once you learn it, you can then choose to break it at your discretion if so inclined. Far better to learn it right off the bat than to learn it years later after realizing that your bad habits are holding you back.

    As you get older, your hands will thank you.
     
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  13. eS.G.

    eS.G. Well-Known Member

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    Fine advice in this thread. Damn Fine.
     
  14. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Active Member

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    Yeah at night I just sit watch tv and practice I learned the a minor pentatonic scale,
    But this is not easy lol the g chord is a pain in the azz and so is the a cord.
    And geting my fingers to stay in place and not move lol
     
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  15. eS.G.

    eS.G. Well-Known Member

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    Practice practice.......a year from now you will make those chords and more without even thinking about it. ;)
     
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  16. Six String

    Six String Moderator Staff Member

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    They are all a "pain in the azz" until you chord without even thinking about it. As a long time rhythm player, I found the easiest way to deal with the scales is to let the lead player worry about them........ LOL. Seriously, you do need to work on them to better yourself. For whatever reason, I never had the knack (drive) to learn/ play scales so now I can play maybe 3 simple leads to thousands of song I can play rhythm to. I got hung up on progressions and chording. I respect Kerry Brown for the effort to undo the those things that most of us won't take the time to do the right way. Take in all of the advise and keep in mind that developing your own style will take time, but can happen. The best compliment ever giving me is that I don't sound like anyone............ :)
     
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  17. Tazz3

    Tazz3 Active Member

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    ok thanks, i will keep it simple i found another A cord its just useing 2 fingers instead of the 3 , love love me do by the beatles is A,D, E iam trying to work on that,, lol

    ALSO I BEEN STANDING IN FRONT OF A MIRRIOR playing to see what my fingers are doing is this good or not??
     
  18. WavMixer

    WavMixer Well-Known Member

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    If you like the G and E chords, you'll love the F and B chords :naughty:

    G is actually my favorite chord because I can flip people off when they tell me my playing sucks.
     
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  19. Heket

    Heket Well-Known Member

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    Heh heh, I was going to say "wait till you get to the F chord!"

    Also with chords be aware of different fingering options. Take G, for example, as this is one where I have found alternate fingering very useful when it comes to chord changes in a song.

    [​IMG]

    Most of the time the left one will be used as it feels more natural and uses your stronger fingers. However, the one on the right is particularly useful if you are going to certain chords such as C Major afterwards.
     
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  20. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the fingering you use for chords is not fixed. It will change depending on where you have just come from, and where you are going next. Some transitions are easier than others. So practice playing chords as part of a sequence, that way you will find which fingering option feels most natural in each setting.
    The two shapes Heket just showed are a case in point. If the next chord is a D, use the first one. If it is a C, use the second.
     
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