Why The Name "Standard"?

Discussion in 'Gibson SG' started by NMA, Nov 16, 2020.

  1. Col Mustard

    Col Mustard Well-Known Member

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    all this honk about advertising slogans that were invented by New York admen
    more than 70 years ago. in those days, the guitar business was a cut-throat competitive
    arena... just like it is today. To hell with all of that. It's irrelevant.

    But then there's us, as players. Leo Fender gave some credence to what
    we wanted and/or needed waY back when, but few others did as much.
    Most of us know what we like.

    IMHO you either like your guitar, or you don't.
    It doesn't matter what some admen decided might sell well in the far-off 1950s
    or the far-out 1960s... IMHO the only thing that matters a fig is how it sounds
    NOW through the signal chain you own, and how it feels to play.

    Think about it that way and it doesn't matter a fig whether you prefer a Fender
    or a Gibson or another brand. It only matters what that instrument can contribute
    to your music.
    10 onstage01-05-13@100.jpg
    That's why we like to own several types.... an SG and a Tele and something else
    of course. Let the song rule what the tone must be. Choose the instrument according
    to what it can do for you. Listen to what it sounds like, and remember what it feels
    like, and that's how you know.
     
  2. ezypikins

    ezypikins Member

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    The Standard, to which all others are measured.
     
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  3. deMelo

    deMelo Well-Known Member

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    IMHO, Fender tells exactly what the Standard stands for

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Yes, it's promo, but the idea is there, all right.
     
  4. deMelo

    deMelo Well-Known Member

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    Funny, I think what happens to RIC guitars is that they're TOO beautiful, so straight forward guitarists who don't own one (myself included until I actually held some and decided that I wanted one) tend to think they're odd-looking.

    But I tell you, regarding beauty, they're possibly the most elegantly designed electric guitars ever. I love mine.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Justin

    Justin Member

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    This is so well said. And this is why every player is going to have slightly different preferences when it comes to model, pickups, strings, amps, etc. It’s about what works for you.
     
  6. ezypikins

    ezypikins Member

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    I like a 660 Ric. Not so much the others. Would like to have a 660-12. But not enough, at this point. To spend the money.
     
  7. NMA

    NMA Well-Known Member

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    And yet there are some things all guitar players can agree upon:
    - Marshall amps are better for hard rock than Roland Jazz Chorus amps
    - flatwound strings are far easier to play than roundwound strings
    - Fender single coils work better for funk than Gibson humbuckers
    - reverb (or any effect) from a good pedal can improve your sound
    - acoustic guitars with cutaways are the ones to buy if you play lead
    - the SG is far easier to play than a Les Paul
    - the Rickenbacker is the most gorgeous guitar ever built

    Yes, we all have our preferences...but there are still some things in the world of guitars that are dogma, 100% true, we all agree upon.
     
  8. donepearce

    donepearce Well-Known Member

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    TROLL ALERT!
     
  9. Go Nigel Go

    Go Nigel Go Well-Known Member

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    Dogma's a bore, and talent trumps gear every time. If I were invited to a metal jam, and all I had was a Gretsch "Country Gentleman" and a Roland Jazz Chorus, I would toss a couple of extra pedals in my bag and find way to make it work. Most of the "Iconic" sounds in Rock and Roll were born of innovation by performers who say "the show must go on" and give it their all with what they have.

    Everyone can and will have gear preferences and dislikes, but why limit yourself to tradition? It certainly isn't required for success, and if taken to dogmatic extremes will make stagnation a near certainty.

    Still not convinced?
     
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  10. NMA

    NMA Well-Known Member

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    1.
    That's a good question. I suppose it comes down to the simple fact that things were better before.

    You name it - boxing, Top 40 music charts, cars, food, clothes, television programming, movies, literature, game shows, travel on an airliner... - things from the past always seem to be better. And that would include musical instruments. Now do you really want a Zoot Suit SG with robo-tuners or would you prefer a '61 SG? The simple fact is things become "traditional" because of their quality. If you want quality, you choose tradition.

    2.
    Tradition leads to stagnation. Another interesting point. Hmmm. Believe it or not, The Sex Pistols, when it came to their music, were traditionalists.
    - Fender P-bass
    - Gretsch drum kit
    - Les Paul, no effects, straight into Fender Twin
    - Chuck Berry floating pinky rhythms
    Basic traditional rock and roll...yet no one on Earth would call the Pistols an example of stagnation in musical history. Far from it. They expanded the musical landscape -- and they did that via traditional instruments.
     
  11. Henry Pond

    Henry Pond Member

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    Stupendously Gratifying?
     
  12. madhermit

    madhermit Member

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    I disagree with at least 4 of these statements and could argue the rest. Absolute statements rarely work, especially on things that are so subjective.
     
  13. deMelo

    deMelo Well-Known Member

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    I tried the 660 but the toasters are a just a tad too sweet for what I do, and the neck on the 620s is faster. Anyway they're essentially the same guitar.
     
  14. ezypikins

    ezypikins Member

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    660 has 12 saddle bridge. If I were to get an electric 12. It would have to be able to intonate.
     
  15. Logan

    Logan Well-Known Member

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    Wait until he finds out about super strats like my Charvel...
    [​IMG]
     
  16. deMelo

    deMelo Well-Known Member

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    The RIC 6 saddle bridge intonates just fine.
     

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